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Accuracy of Patient Information in You Tube Videos

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Press Release:
    YouTube videos can inaccurately depict Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders
     
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    Analysis of youtube as a source of information for peripheral neuropathy
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    PUBLIC RELEASE: 23-OCT-2017
    Dr. YouTube ... what's your diagnosis?
    Evaluating the educational quality of seasonal influenza videos on YouTube
    TORONTO (October 23, 2017)--According to Pew Research center, in 2013, about six out of ten Americans searched for health information online in the past year. With patients regularly turning to the internet for health advice, a group of researchers aimed to evaluate the educational quality of seasonal influenza videos on the user-generated, video-sharing platform, YouTube.

    Researchers conducted akeyword search of "seasonal influenza" from January 28 to February 5, 2017. The top most viewed videos that appeared in the search results were included and analyzed for video characteristics, source, and content. The source of videos was then classified as health-care provider, alternative-medicine provider, patient and/or patients' parents, company, media, or professional society. Utilizing the latest CDC guidelines, a scoring system was created to evaluate the quality (-10 to +40). Negative points were provided for misleading information. Ten blinded reviewers scored each video independently.

    Three hundred videos were analyzed, with a median of 341 views, 1 likes, 0 dislikes, and 0 comments. More video presenters were male (39.3%) and the predominant race depicted was Caucasian (73.6%). The most common type of video source was professional societies (38.3%) and least represented was alternative medicine provider (1.3%). Among the six video sources, the mean scores showed a statistically significant difference from each other (p<0.001). There was a higher mean score for health-care provider (4.50) when compared with other video sources (mean scores ranging from 0.47 to 4.17).

    "This study confirmed that most YouTube videos on seasonal influenza are provided by professional societies and health-care providers, with over half of the videos attempting to educate patients," says Dr. Lakshmi Kallur, lead researcher and resident physician in the Department of Internal Medicine at East Tennessee State University's Quillen College of Medicine, "these videos, although containing accurate information, did not fulfill our criteria as far as educating patients thoroughly."

    Further results from this study will be shared at CHEST Annual Meeting 2017 in Toronto on Wednesday, November 1, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The study abstract can be viewed on the journal CHEST® website.
     
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    Press Release:
    YouTube is Source of Misinformation on Plastic Surgery, Rutgers Study Finds
    The first study to evaluate videos on facial plastic surgery procedures finds most are misleading
    August 16, 2018
    In the first study to evaluate YouTube videos on facial plastic surgery procedures, Rutgers University researchers found that most are misleading marketing campaigns posted by non-qualified medical professionals.

    The millions of people who turn to YouTube as a source for education on facial plastic surgery receive a false understanding that does not include the risks or alternative options, said lead author Boris Paskhover, an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School’s department of otolaryngology who specializes in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    The study appears in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

    “Videos on facial plastic surgery may be mainly marketing campaigns and may not fully be intended as educational,” Paskhover said.
    Paskhover and a team of students at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School evaluated 240 top-viewed videos with 160 million combined views that resulted from keyword searches for “blepharoplasty,” “eyelid surgery,” “dermal fillers,” “facial fillers,” “otoplasty,” “ear surgery,” “rhytidectomy,” “facelift,” “lip augmentation,” “lip fillers,” “rhinoplasty” and/or “nose job.”

    The researchers evaluated the videos using DISCERN criteria, a scale for assessing the quality of medical information presented online or in other media, which takes into account risks, a discussion of non-surgical options and the validity of the information presented. The researchers also evaluated the people who posted the videos, including whether they were health care professionals, patients or third parties. Physicians were rated by their board status on the American Board of Medical Specialties database.

    The results revealed that the majority of videos did not include professionals qualified in the procedures portrayed, including 94 videos with no medical professional at all. Seventy-two videos, featuring board-certified physicians, had relatively high DISCERN scores and provided some valuable patient information. “However, even videos posted by legitimate board-certified surgeons may be marketing tools made to look like educational videos,” said Paskhover.

    “Patients and physicians who use YouTube for educational purposes should be aware that these videos can present biased information, be unbalanced when evaluating risks versus benefits and be unclear about the qualifications of the practitioner,” said Paskhover. “YouTube is for marketing. The majority of the people who post these videos are trying to sell you something.”
     
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