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AFO for foot drop

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by podlover, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. podlover

    podlover Welcome New Poster


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    I have a patient with left foot drop, due to brain injury few years ago. This is going to be the first time I'm prescribing an AFO so I'm not sure what I should assess, how do I measure/cast, what type of AFO should I be looking for my patient, and MOST IMPORTANTLY--- Any recommendations on which company I should get it from? I'm based in Malaysia. So any company that is willing to ship here is fine with me as well.

    Cheers
     
  2. Leah Claydon

    Leah Claydon Active Member

    You could take a look at the Richie Brace - various suppliers. Good videos on you tube if you want to look at how they fit/function. In UK Firefly are the main suppliers - they have advice on how to cast/prescribe/fit on their website.

    Leah
     
  3. Jeff Root

    Jeff Root Well-Known Member

  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    The Ritchie Brace is essentially an orthotic with a brace attached to it. If the patient doesn't need the orthotic, there are some OTC foot drop braces that are less expensive. Google foot drop brace.

    Eric
     
  5. Eric,
    The name is spelled "Richie" and I would suggest that most patients with foot drop will benefit from a balanced custom orthotic footplate as part of their bracing strategy. Rarely is the muscle imbalance isolated to the sagittal plane and often frontal plane deformity or instability results in drop foot conditions. But, just in case the foot remains stable and non-pathologic, we offer a prefabricated Dynamic Assist OTC brace as well.
    Doug
     
  6. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Sorry, Doug.
    I did say if the patient doesn't need the orthotic... Thanks for the mention of your OTC brace.
     
  7. footplant

    footplant Active Member

    Last edited: Dec 17, 2014
  8. WApod

    WApod Member

    If this patient just needs ground clearance and not a full AFO you could try a "foot up" or "Navigait" device. There is no need to cast and they can be worn with any lace up shoe.
     
  9. Orthican

    Orthican Active Member

    In the information you supplied when asking about an AFO you indicated "head injury".
    With an upper motor neuron lesion there can be mild or significant muscle spasticity in the plantarflexor group. Was the patient assessed for spasticity ? It can make a profound difference in what is used.
     
  10. Doogle

    Doogle Active Member

    QUOTE=Doug Richie D.P.M.;355132]Eric,
    The name is spelled "Richie" and I would suggest that most patients with foot drop will benefit from a balanced custom orthotic footplate as part of their bracing strategy. Rarely is the muscle imbalance isolated to the sagittal plane and often frontal plane deformity or instability results in drop foot conditions. But, just in case the foot remains stable and non-pathologic, we offer a prefabricated Dynamic Assist OTC brace as well.
    Doug[/QUOTE]

    Hello Dr Richie

    Why are you stating that your device is better because it is balanced? Can you please explain this? I am sorry for my ignorance, I am s a student. Thank you
     
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