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alcohol and hyperkeratosis

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by crambo, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. crambo

    crambo Member


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    Hi,

    can anyone help me with some information regarding long term alcohol abuse and hyperkeratosis of the feet,

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. twirly

    twirly Well-Known Member

    Hi crambo,

    :welcome: to Podiatry Arena.

    I have searched online (as I'm sure you have already). :confused:

    The only thing I could find was on the Dermatology Atlas

    Hopefully someone else may provide some more information.

    Kind regards,

    Mandy.
     
  3. crambo

    crambo Member

    Hi Mandy,

    many thanks for the link, :D, will have a good look at this.

    take care,
    Crambo.
     
  4. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    Welcome Crambo, good to have you along,
    may be worthwhile asking in another forum.
    thinking outside the square, perhaps the neuropathy associated could change dynamics, eg friction / pressure / unaware so no alteration to footwear and etc?

    Cheersw
     
  5. crambo

    crambo Member

    Hi,

    thanks for that, will look further into the friction aspect,

    many thanks,
    crambo
     
  6. corndolly

    corndolly Member

    Hi, I know its slightly different but I had a 22 year old in last week with bad bromhydrosis and a regular recreational drug and excess alcohol lifestyle. He only came for treatment as his mother was charging him for all the bed sheets he was staining with his excess sweating. He was not prepared to change his lifestyle as he wanted to live a short but full life!! I have spoken to a family doctor friend who informed me that his drug habit was probably effecting his metabolism and hence the excess sweating. interesting .
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2009
  7. crambo

    crambo Member

    Hi Corndolly,

    Many thanks for that,

    the drug use is very interesting indeed,

    thanks,
    Crambo
     
  8. Julian Head

    Julian Head Active Member

    Hi

    Long-term alcohol use is known to cause "alcohol-related neuropathy". The amounts needed to see changes are surprisingly low (25-30 units a week is all is takes). You may see the same neuropathic gait as neuropathic diabetics, which leads to the same hyperkeratosis and other lesions (ulcers, etc).

    I have treated several patients with glove and stocking neuropathy related to long-term alcohol abuse, mostly well-off well-to-do city chaps. The condition is considered reversible as long as there is no neuropathy in the finger tips, once present it is usually non-reversible.

    The sweats described here are often called "meat-sweats" by patients, as they describe feeling like a clammy piece of meat......nice huh?

    See this link for a general overview: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1174146-overview

    Hope this helps

    Julian
     
  9. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    Julian a nice overview, thanks

    Cheers
     
  10. corndolly

    corndolly Member

    Hi re:hyperkeratosis and alcohol consumption.
    I have just had a very interesting day treating inmates at a local prison. 4 patients were of huge interest with notable neuropathy on both feet in the classical stock or stocking style. all were alcoholics. 2 guys had dreadfull fungal infection on the plantar surface which was driving them mad while the other 2 had burning pain in the same area without the fungal infection. all cases were kept awake at night with the burning sensation. all guys had the feeling that they were walking on cotton wool and had possible gait problems-I was unable to check as there is no room to examine a walking gait. Their medical problems are numerous and diabetes has been ruled out in all 4 patients. Had fun trying to think of alternative ways to removing hard skin as files are not available!!! hope this is of interest and any ideas would be brill.
     
  11. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    Hi corn dolly perhaps you could also post your question in another forum. This has been an interesting thread but Introduction forum is perhpas not as well read as other forums.

    You art right though, an interesting dilema? Sandpaper? varying degrees of roughness??

    Cheers
     
  12. crambo

    crambo Member

    Hi Julian,

    sorry for the delayed response, have been away,

    many thanks for that,

    crambo
     
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