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Attitudes to prescribed diabetic footwear

Discussion in 'Diabetic Foot & Wound Management' started by NewsBot, Feb 14, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Patient and professional perspectives on prescribed therapeutic footwear for people with diabetes: A vignette study.
    Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Feb 7; [Epub ahead of print]
    Johnson M, Newton P, Goyder E.
     
  2. Foot fan

    Foot fan Active Member

    I have a patient who continually refuses to wear 'grandma shoes' which by their definition is anything closed in with a lace. It is important to consider the patients perspective but one would think it slightly more important to advise more 'appropriate' and 'fitted' footwear, especially in cases where the diabetic foot has significantly changed shape. The patient's perspective that pointed toed high heels 'look great' when the forefoot is twice the size it's meant to be and almost at right angles to the rest of the foot doesn't really seem a viable one to me.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Patient perceptions of stock footwear design features.
    Prosthet Orthot Int. 2006 Apr;30(1):61-71
     
  4. John Spina

    John Spina Active Member

    I have found that most patients who qualify for the Diabetic shoe program here not only do not mind the shoes,they will insist on getting their pair.The shoes can help prevent ulcerations and the nice part,if you will is that they come at either no or little cost to the patient.Heck,even my office staff knows the drill..."Dr.Spina,this patient is a diabetic..please give her/him a pair of shoes.."
     
  5. robby

    robby Active Member

    It doesnt quite work like that here in the UK.

    Patients have to be seen in a Diabetic Foot Clinic, the Pod then has to get a form signed by a Diabetologist. The patient then sees an Orthotist who either has a bespoke pair of shoes made (cost £150+ ) or a modified stock pair (cost £80+) or stock pair (cost£60+). These are provided free of charge to the patient, who may o may not wear them. An insole may or may not be provided (by orthotist or podiatrist) and the patient may of waited up to 3/4months for the shoes, so the foot may of changed shape again in the meantime and the shoes may not fit!!

    The mentality in the UK is that if it is for free I'll take it but may or may not wear it!
    patients tend to wear the footwear provided only when the feet have changed shape so much that they cannot fit them into 'standard' footwear.

    The VAST majority of Diabetic aptients in the UK use standard footwar, we try to recommend Training shoes, as these are a good compromise (and yes we know they are a compromise, but its the best compromise available)
     
  6. John Spina

    John Spina Active Member

    Robby:The same here.I DO have to have a doctor sign off on a form before it can be approved.They get 1 pair of shoes per year.The patients like this service and ask for it.I refer them to the pedorthist for the shoes,as stocking them and doing it myself appears to be,while profitable,a pain in the rump...besides,I go to a few offices and make house calls,so where in blazes will I keep the shoes?I do not make the big profit on it.All I get out of it is an increased supply of happy patients!
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Use and usability of custom-made orthopedic shoes.
    van Netten JJ, Jannink MJ, Hijmans JM, Geertzen JH, Postema K.
    J Rehabil Res Dev. 2010;47(1):73-81.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Patients' expectations and actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes.
    van Netten JJ, Jannink MJ, Hijmans JM, Geertzen JH, Postema K.
    Clin Rehabil. 2010 Oct;24(10):919-27. Epub 2010 Jun 24.
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Long-term use of custom-made orthopedic shoes: 1.5-year follow-up study.
    van Netten JJ, Jannink MJ, Hijmans JM, Geertzen JH, Postema K.
    J Rehabil Res Dev. 2010;47(7):643-9.
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    "Münsteraner foot- and shoe score" - objectivation of patient satisfaction after provision with orthopedic shoes
    Illgner U, Schnieder K, Seintsch H, Osada N, Wetz HH.
    Z Orthop Unfall. 2011 Aug;149(4):418-23.
     
  11. Orthican

    Orthican Active Member

    I have found that I cannot trust the information gleaned from them in any verbal sense regarding the problem a lot of the time. Some yes, but most no. Unfortunately. They recognise an "issue" but do not recognise the severity of it. They tend to mix mis information with half rememberances of visits and talks along the way with all the different practitioners and "well meaning" friends who see them.
    A lot of denial seems to prevail in this population. (The patient presenting with wounds secondary to type 2)

    However, I have noted an increase in those of the denial group once presenting with a second wound...they are oddly enough now convinced that they should follow along and follow up.

    I like it when they follow up with all of us. And really as long as the team is all working together for the same goal It works..
    I dislike it when you get to know them they start to get lazy with the care and then you read about them. It seems to happen all too often. Epidemic indeed...makes a horrible mess of people both physically and mentally. You can see it happen over time..
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Patients' Experience of therapeutic footwear whilst living at risk of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA)
    Joanne S Paton, Anne Roberts, Graham K Bruce and Jonathan Marsden
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2014, 7:16 doi:10.1186/1757-1146-7-16
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Footwear Appropriateness, Preferences and Foot Ulcer Risk Among Adult Diabetics at Makati Medical Center Outpatient Department
    Joie DJ Isip, Milldeanna de Guzman, Andres Ebison Jr., Carolyn Narvacan-Montano
    Isip; Vol 31, No 1 (2016)
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Communication techniques for improved acceptance and adherence with therapeutic footwear
    Jaap J van Netten et al
    Prosthet Orthot Int June 8, 2016
     
  15. cyril20th

    cyril20th Member

    I had a patient who really was in pain, it was obvious that she was wearing high heels. When questioned she denied this. After a while i refereed her to a orthopedic surgeon.

    After his examination, he asked her the same question. He was a Harley street man who spoke with a very posh accent. When she said no to this question. He replied Madam you are a liar!. she took it from him at great expense to her.

    The resistance to advice on footwear can be a problem.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Perceived role of therapeutic footwear in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers: A survey of patients with diabetes mellitus in Kaduna State
    Tagang I Jerry et al
    Niger J Basic Clin Sci 2016;13:78-84
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections.
    Jarl G et al
    Patient Prefer Adherence. 2016 Aug 8
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Orthopedic shoes: Still in touch with the times?
    Greitemann B
    Z Rheumatol. 2015 Nov;74(9):786-92.
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Patient’s perspective with regards to wearing diabetic therapeutic footwear : an interpretative phenomenological analysis
    Borg, Anthea
    B.SC.(HONS)PODIATRY Thesis 2016; University of Malta
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Foot anthropometrics in individuals with diabetes compared with the general Swedish population – Implications for shoe design
    Ulla Hellstrand Tang, Jacqueline Siegenthaler, Kerstin Hagberg, Jon Karlsson, Roy Tranberg
    The Foot and Ankle Online Journal 10 (3): 1
     
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