Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Avulsion fracture of the styloid process?

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by locky, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. locky

    locky Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    avulsion fracture of the styloid process??

    I have an eleven year old male who presented with pain at the styloid process following an inversion sprain. Xrays reported "no abnormality detected", however the film appeared to show an avulsion fracture of the styloid process. The "fracture" ran parallel with the 5th met, not angled toward the cuboid. It did not show a uniform separation, appearing to be still fixed to the shaft distally. Bilateral views revealed the contralateral foot to have the same appearance despite no history of injury. Is this a normal epiphyseal variation of what is an otherwise healthy 5th met?? Subsequent xrays reveal the non union still exists despite the patient being now assymptomatic. Is careful reintroduction to sport appropriate for this 11 year old??
     
  2. Ryan McCallum

    Ryan McCallum Active Member

    Could possibly be an accessory bone at the 5th met base. Os vesalianum??
     
  3. Dermotfox

    Dermotfox Active Member

  4. LuckyLisfranc

    LuckyLisfranc Well-Known Member

    This condition is Iselin's disease (traction apophysitis of the peroneus brevis at the attachment to the 5th MT tuberosity), and is a similar condition to Sever's and Osgood-Schlatter's.

    On x-ray the appearances will be suggestive of avulsion fracture, however in an active young male of 11 years of age, you can bet the house on it being Iselin's disease.

    Rest, ice, immobilisation etc etc. Stable lace-up shoes and maybe a prefabricated orthotic usually suffice.

    Google "Iselin's disease" to learn more. :)

    LL
     
Loading...

Share This Page