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Blood flow restriction (occlusion) training

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Craig Payne, Mar 11, 2015.

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    Articles:
    1
    A method to standardize the blood flow restriction pressure by an elastic cuff
    Takashi Abe J. Grant Mouser Scott J. Dankel Zachary W. Bell Samuel L. Buckner Kevin T. Mattocks Matthew B. Jessee Jeremy P. Loenneke
    23 November 2018
     
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    Articles:
    1
    Blood Flow–Restricted Training for Lower Extremity Muscle Weakness due to Knee Pathology: A Systematic Review
    Sue Barber-Westin BS, Frank R. Noyes, MD
    Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach November 26, 2018
     
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    Articles:
    1
    Ischemic Preconditioning, O2 Kinetics, and Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia
    Wiggins, Chad C et al
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: December 27, 2018 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
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    Articles:
    1
    Blood Flow Restriction Only Increases Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis with Exercise
    Nyakayiru, Jean et al
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: January 25, 2019 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
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    Ischemic Preconditioning Improves Strength Endurance Performance
    Carvalho, Leonardo; Barroso, Renato
    The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: March 04, 2019 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
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    Articles:
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    Perceptual changes to progressive resistance training with and without blood flow restriction
    Kevin T. Mattocks, J. Grant Mouser, Matthew B. Jessee, Samuel L. Buckner, Scott J. Dankel, Zachary W. Bell,
    Journal of Sports Sciences 05 Feb 2019
     
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    Articles:
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    Blood Flow Restriction Training in Rehabilitation: A Useful Adjunct or Lucy's Latest Trick?
    Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 2019 Volume:49 Issue:5 Pages:294–298 DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2019.0608
     
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    Use of Blood Flow Restriction Training for Postoperative Rehabilitation
    Wilkinson, Brandon G et al
    Current Sports Medicine Reports: June 2019 - Volume 18 - Issue 6 - p 224–228
     
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    Articles:
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    Seven-day ischaemic preconditioning improves muscle efficiency during cycling
    Owen Jeffries et al
    Journal of Sports Sciences : 09 Sep 2019
     
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    Articles:
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    Effect of Cuff Pressure on Blood Flow during Blood Flow–restricted Rest and Exercise
    Crossley, Kent W. et al
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: September 16, 2019 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
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    Articles:
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    Potential Implications of Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Vascular Health: A Brief Review
    Dahan da Cunha NascimentoBrad J. SchoenfeldJonato Prestes
    Sports Medicine: 26 September 2019
     
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    The Safety of Blood Flow Restriction Training as a Therapeutic Intervention for Patients With Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review
    Melissa C. Minniti, SPT, Andrew P. Statkevich, SPT, Ryan L. Kelly, SPT, ...
    The American Journal of Sports Medicine November 11, 2019
     
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    The Safety of Blood Flow Restriction Training as a Therapeutic Intervention for Patients With Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review
    Melissa C. Minniti, SPT*, Andrew P. Statkevich, SPT, Ryan L. Kelly, SPT, ...
    AJSM November 11, 2019
    Background:
    The effectiveness of blood flow restriction training (BFRT) as compared with other forms of training, such as resistance training, has been evaluated in the literature in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, the safety of this intervention has been summarized only in healthy populations and not in clinical populations with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Purpose:
    To evaluate the safety and adverse events associated with BFRT in patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Study Design:
    Systematic review.

    Methods:
    A literature search was conducted with 3 online databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Embase). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies were as follows: (1) BFRT was used as a clinical intervention, (2) study participants had a disorder of the musculoskeletal system, (3) authors addressed adverse events, (4) studies were published in English, and (5) the intervention was performed with human participants.

    Results:
    Nineteen studies met eligibility criteria, with a pooled sample size of 322. Diagnoses included various knee-related disorders, inclusion body myositis, polymyositis or dermatomyositis, thoracic outlet syndrome, Achilles tendon rupture, and bony fractures. Nine studies reported no adverse events, while 3 reported rare adverse events, including an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis and rhabdomyolysis. Three case studies reported common adverse events, including acute muscle pain and acute muscle fatigue. In the randomized controlled trials, individuals exposed to BFRT were not more likely to have an adverse event than individuals exposed to exercise alone. Of the 19 studies, the adverse events were as follows: overall, 14 of 322; rare overall, 3 of 322; rare BFRT, 3 of 168; rare control, 0 of 154; any adverse BFRT, 10 of 168; any adverse control, 4 of 154. A majority of studies were excluded because they did not address safety.

    Conclusion:
    BFRT appears to be a safe strengthening approach for knee-related musculoskeletal disorders, but further research is needed to make definitive conclusions and to evaluate the safety in other musculoskeletal conditions. Improved definitions of adverse events related to BFRT are needed to include clear criteria for differentiating among common, uncommon, and rare adverse events. Finally, further research is needed to effectively screen who might be at risk for rare adverse events.
     
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