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circulation to the foot

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by DPM30, Apr 16, 2009.

< L.A | hello all. >
  1. DPM30

    DPM30 Welcome New Poster


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    Hello everyone,

    I was challenged by a 4th year DPM student, who claims she learned in her anatomy class, that 90 something percent of the arterial circulation to the foot of a healthy patient is supplied by the PT. I tend to disagree since I think, that it is common finding that the DP(dorsalis pedis) supplies more blood to the foot than the PT. I couldn't find anything on the subject when I tried to google it. Can anyone help me with this?
     
  2. twirly

    twirly Well-Known Member

    Hi DPM30.

    :welcome: to Podiatry Arena.

    I too went for a Google ;)

    http://anatomy.med.umich.edu/musculoskeletal_system/leg_ans.html#7o

    http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Doi=147664

    Google Scholar is also a valuable resource although many publications require payment to view.

    Regards,

    Mandy.
     
  3. DPM30

    DPM30 Welcome New Poster

    Thank you twirly for taking the time to respond to me.
     
  4. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    Welcome to Podiatry Arena, thanks for that Mandy, you are always a bonus! Not sure how you find the time to do all the googling and searching but we are all lucky that you do.

    Cheers
     
  5. drsarbes

    drsarbes Well-Known Member

    DPM30:
    Interesting question.

    I'd be interested in the students (or her teacher's) source of information.
    On a practical level, I don't think many of us regard an absent DP pulse as clinically important if there are no other signs of PVD (unlike an absent PT), in fact an absent Dorsalis Pedis is an anatomical variant.

    On the other hand, I would be curious as to why they are teaching physiology in anatomy class.

    Steve
     
  6. DPM30

    DPM30 Welcome New Poster

    Thank you all for your replies, DrSarbes, you're saying that if PT is absent the patient has a bigger risk of having PVD? while if the DP is absent since it's a normal variant in some cases is not an indication of PVD?
    thank you
     
< L.A | hello all. >
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