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Does ice improve the outcome of soft tissue injuries?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Is ice right? Does cryotherapy improve outcome for acute soft tissue injury?
    Collins NC.
    Emerg Med J. 2008 Feb;25(2):65-8.
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    There was this older review on the same topic

    The Use of Ice in the Treatment of Acute Soft-Tissue Injury
    A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Chris Bleakley, Suzanne McDonough and Domhnall MacAuley
    The American Journal of Sports Medicine 32:251-261 (2004)
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Effects of cold water immersion on lower extremity joint biomechanics during running
    Claudiane Arakaki Fukuchi, Emmanuel Souza da Roch & Darren John Stefanyshyn
    Journal of Sports Sciences; Published online: 26 Sep 2014
     
  4. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Yes it does
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  6. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    My Experience, over many years of treating sprain injuries and severe brusing in full contact fighting sports, is - ice it and get better qucikly - don't ice it and stay off injured for much longer. One exception is this, with minor sprains ignore the p[ain and just work thru it, you'll often find that bt the end of training it wont hurt anymmore. But if it does then ice it.

    My theory after reading contrary research is this: Ice relieves the p[ain and swelling enough so that you can quickly get back to mobilising and strengthening the muscles and ligaments that stabilise the joint. So while icing, in itself, may be detrimental the much greater positive effect of the folowing rehab treatment that can occurr earlier results in faster rehabilitation. Thats why minor sprains that are iced post immediately injury (and therefore rested) can take longer to heal than if you just work thru it.

    I see many patients who did not ice their sprained ankle (but also didnt do or recieve any other therapy) who spend months nursing a painful joint.

    There has to be a planned rehab that IMO is ice, immobilisation of the joint (or rest i.e. non w/b) for a short time, then mobilisation then strengthening and all th etime maintaining strapping or support till the joint is stable enough and increasing activity as the joint becomes painfree and stronger. The timing of these event is tailored to the person and the type and severity of the injury so no fixed paradigms in those terms. This is nothing new of course but it is a course of action that works regularly and reliably.

    I wouldn't drop icing without very strong evidence, which one might assume would be easy to gather i.e. just do a treat and not treat with ice experiment with all other variables the same and see who returns to their chosen activity first.

    regards Dave
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Negative Impact of Icing Treatment on Qualitative
    Recovery of Injured Soleus Muscle in Rats

    Tsubasa Shibaguchi et al
    ACSM ANNUAL MEETING
    May 28 – June 1, 2019 – Orlando, Florida

     
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