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Foot forces during typical days on the international space station

Discussion in 'Podiatry Trivia' started by NewsBot, May 14, 2010.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Foot forces during typical days on the international space station.
    Cavanagh PR, Genc KO, Gopalakrishnan R, Kuklis MM, Maender CC, Rice AJ.
    J Biomech. 2010 May 10. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  2. Who said increased ground reaction force on the plantar foot is always a bad thing for the human body??
     
  3. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Foot forces during exercise on the International Space Station.
    Genc KO, Gopalakrishnan R, Kuklis MM, Maender CC, Rice AJ, Bowersox KD, Cavanagh PR.
    J Biomech. 2010 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Changes in toe clearance during treadmill walking after long-duration spaceflight.
    Miller CA, Peters BT, Brady RR, Richards JR, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ.
    Aviat Space Environ Med. 2010 Oct;81(10):919-28.
     
  6. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Hi all
    I just read through this thread and wondered if anyone had had the same thought as me .
    Why not use the muscular forces generated by one astronaut to apply force to and resist force from, the musculoskeletal system of another astronaut . In this way it may be possible to provide sufficient stimulus to avoid degradation of the various body systems .It would require a suitable framework to control the interface and the forces being applied could be measured by in-shoe instrumentation .
    Any thoughts ?
    Scotfoot
     
  7. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    With regard to the previous post please consider the following .
    First take a park bench made up of wooden slats and remove the back rest section .
    Next take two individuals A and B and get them to lie flat on their backs on the bench pointing in opposite directions and with the soles of their feet touching . Next get them to inch towards each other along the bench but with the soles of their feet still touching ,till their legs bend at the knee to an angle of about 45 degrees and their legs are raised off the bench by about 40 cm or so .
    Next introduce a foot board beween the feet of A and B so that the two individuals are now separated by it . Next take a rigid pole and attatch it to the middle of the lower border of the foot board and then run it down through the slats of the bench and attatch it to the ground via a hinge which will allow movement of the footboard in a direction roughly parallel to the long axis of the bench .Finally provide handles for A and B ,attatched to the bench ,that they can grip whilst their arms are extended by their sides .A and B are now in a position to apply forces to each others musculoskeletal systems .
    The device would allow A to use both legs against one of Bs etc and could be used for eccentric and concentric exercise as well as for impact and non impact exercise .
    Large ground reaction forces could be duplicated.
    In a microgravity enviroment the anchor for the foot board pole could be provided by an extension of the main body of the framework thus providing a free floating , closed energy system tethered fore and aft to the body of a craft .
    A bench would not be required to support A and B in a microgravity enviroment and so it could be replaced by a simple framework .
    The device outlined above would weigh only a few pounds in a 1 g enviroment
    Any thoughts ?
    Scotfoot
     
  8. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Further to the previous 2 posts in this thread it may be possible to use a modified version of the exercise frame to target the peronial and tibialis posterior muscles.
    This would be achieved in the following way .
    Firstly , the pole attatching the footboard to the frame would be secured in a position perpendicular to the long axis of the frame by a locking device . Next , the pole could be continued up into a housing element in the footboard where it could be secured by a second locking device . When the lock on the pole section in the footboard is released the footboard would be able to rotate around the long axis of the pole . Subject A would then place his/her feet at on the board as far from the axis of rotation as possible to give maximum mechanical advantage . Subject B would place his/ her feet on the board close to each other and on either side of the axis . A would then rotate the footboard from side to side whilst B tried to resist the movement . This would involve many of the muscles of the body including the peroneals and tibialis posterior.
    Any thoughts ?

    Regards
    Gerrard Farrell
    (scotfoot)
     
  9. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Please note that in the last post "on either side of the axis " should read " on one side of, but close to the axis ".
    Gerrard Farrell
    (Scotfoot)
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Selective skin sensitivity changes and sensory re-weighting following short duration space flight.
    Lowrey CR, Perry SD, Strzalkowski ND, Williams DR, Wood SJ, Bent LR.
    J Appl Physiol (1985). 2014 Jan 23
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Foot-ground reaction force during long-term space flight and after it: walking in active treadmill mode
    AlinaSavekoaIlyaRukavishnikovaVitalyBrykovaNikolayOsetskyaSergeyRyazanskiyaMr. AlexeyGrishinbElenaTomilovskayaaInesaKozlovskayaa
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  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Effects of Spaceflight on Musculoskeletal Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, Considerations for Interplanetary Travel
    Paul Comfort, John. J. McMahon, Paul. A. Jones, Matthew Cuthbert, Kristina Kendall, Jason. P. Lake & G. Gregory Haff
    Sports Medicine (2021)
     
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