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Foot symptoms are associated with poorer physical function

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Jan 13, 2011.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot symptoms are independently associated with poor self-reported and performance-based physical function: The johnston county osteoarthritis project.
    Golightly YM, Hannan MT, Amy X, Helmick CG, Renner JB, Jordan JM.
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Jan 10. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Prevalence of foot conditions in a geriatric population and their impact on mobility, gait and tendency to falls.
    Martínez-Gallardo Prieto L, Hermida Galindo LF, D'hyver de Las Deses C.
    Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol. 2011 Oct 13. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot Pain and Mobility Limitations in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study.
    Menz HB, Dufour AB, Casey VA, Riskowski JL, McLean RR, Katz P, Hannan MT.
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 May 23.
     
  4. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

    Could it be that the poor levels of fitness lead to their foot conditions?
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Associations of foot posture and function to lower extremity pain: The Framingham Foot Study.
    Riskowski J, Dufour A, Hagedorn T, Hillstrom H, Casey V, Hannan M.
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jun 5.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot Disorders, Foot Posture, and Foot Function: The Framingham Foot Study
    Thomas J. Hagedorn, Alyssa B. Dufour, Jody L. Riskowski, Howard J. Hillstrom, Hylton B. Menz, Virginia A. Casey, Marian T. Hannan
    PLoS ONE 8(9): e74364. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0074364
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot Pain, But Not Foot Structure Or Foot Function, Are Associated With Self-Reported Physical Limitations: The Framingham Foot Study
    Dufour, Alyssa B. PhD, Katz, Patricia P. PhD; Casey, Virginia A. PhD; Hannan, Marian T. DSc, MPH; Menz, Hylton B. PhD
    American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting; Oct 26-30, 2013; San Diego
     
  8. NewsBot

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    The association of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function in the Framingham Foot Study
    Robert R McLean, Alyssa B Dufour, Patricia P Katz, Howard J Hillstrom, Thomas J Hagedorn, Marian T Hannan
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2014, 7:46 (12 November 2014)
     
  9. NewsBot

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    The Effect of Foot Pain on Mobility Disability in Older Adults: The FraminghamFootStudy. AlyssaB.Dufour, PatriciaP.Katz, YvonneM. Golightly, Arunima Awale and Marian T. Hannan.
    American College of Rheumatology Conference; Boston 14-19 November 2014
     
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    SeverityofFootPainIsLinkedtothePrevalenceofDepressiveSymptoms: TheFraminghamFootStudy.
    ArunimaAwale,AlyssaB.Dufour,PatriciaP. Katz,VirginiaA.CaseyandMarianT.Hannan.
    American College of Rheumatology Conference; Boston 14-19 November 2014
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    NON-STRUCTURAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CURRENT AND NEW FOOT PAIN: DATA FROM THE TASMANIAN OLDER ADULT COHORT STUDY
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Leg Muscle Mass and Foot Symptoms, Structure, and Function: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.
    Golightly YM, Dufour AB, Hannan MT, Hillstrom HJ, Katz PP, Jordan JM.
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Aug 21. pii: glv136
     
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    The association of fat mass and adipokines with foot pain in a community cohort.
    Walsh TP, Gill TK, Evans AM, Yaxley A, Shanahan EM, Hill CL
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2015 Aug 28. doi: 10.1002/acr.2271
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot Pain and Pronated Foot Type Are Associated with Self-Reported Mobility Limitations in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study.
    Menz HB, Dufour AB, Katz P, Hannan MT.
    Gerontology. 2015 Dec 9.
     
  15. NewsBot

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    Foot Function, Foot Pain, and Falls in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study.
    Awale A et al
    Gerontology. 2017 May 9. doi: 10.1159/000475710
     
  16. NewsBot

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    PUBLIC RELEASE: 9-MAY-2017
    Severe foot pain linked to recurrent falls
    BOSTON -- Researchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain - correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls. This finding also extends to those diagnosed with planus foot posture (flat feet), indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls among older adults.

    Using data from the Framingham Foot study, researchers found that foot pain and foot posture were not associated with any one fall; however, in the case of multiple falls, foot pain and foot posture were often a factor. These findings were published today in the journal Gerontology.

    "We know that having more than one fall can be of concern. Many don't think of feet as the culprit. However, higher odds of recurrent falls were seen for those with foot pain, especially severe foot pain, as well as those with planus foot posture, indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls," said Marian Hannan, Co -Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center at the Institute for Aging Research and Associate Professor of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health.

    "This is important because falls are a serious problem for older adults. They are a leading cause of hospitalization and often lead to a loss of independence, a decrease in quality of life, and sometimes death. With this new knowledge we hope to find more solutions to lessen the risk of falls in older adults," said Lead author Arunima Awale, Research Associate at Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research.

    More than 30 percent of individuals over the age of 65 fall at least once a year. This figure increases to over 40% for persons aged 75 years or older. As a result of this study, scientists are hopeful that by lessening the instance of foot pain in older adults they can significantly reduce hospitalizations and loss of independence for American seniors.

    ###

    This study was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and National Institute of Aging (grant number AR047853); and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study N01-HC-25195).

    About the Institute for Aging Research
    Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research seek to transform the human experience of aging by conducting research that will ensure a life of health, dignity and productivity into advanced age. The Institute carries out rigorous studies that discover the mechanisms of age-related disease and disability; lead to the prevention, treatment and cure of disease; advance the standard of care for older people; and inform public decision-making. The Aging Brain Center within IFAR studies cognitive aging and conditions affecting brain health.

    About Hebrew SeniorLife
    Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, is a national senior services leader uniquely dedicated to rethinking, researching and redefining the possibilities of aging. Founded in Boston in 1903, the nonprofit, non-sectarian organization today provides communities and health care for seniors, research into aging, and education for geriatric care providers. For more information about Hebrew SeniorLife, visit http://www.hebrewseniorlife.org, follow us on Twitter @H_SeniorLife, like us on Facebook or read our blog.
     
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