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Interpretation of pressure plate and FTC for dummies

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by JHZ123, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. JHZ123

    JHZ123 Welcome New Poster


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    Hi all this is my first post.
    I need help on interpretation of pressure plate analysis especially force time curves and COP.
    I have read somewhere about heel plateau, central plateau and forefoot plateau. Is that really it??
    Can this date be simplified that much?
    Really need a dummies explanation please!:bash:
     
  2. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    JHZ
    I'd be happy to help if you weren't so anonymous, are you in UK? There's a lot to know, have you bought a pressure mat system, which one? Perhaps you could ask some specific questions, the just tell me everything but keep it simple approach isn't very helpful. What's you're levelof physics education or knowledge?
    Email me at david@foothouse.co.uk or if you got a few colleague together I could do a 1 day course, I have a presentation all ready or I could do something more ad hoc

    Regards Dave
     
  3. efuller

    efuller MVP

    You can function at different levels of knowledge. You can function at level where you make changes in your orthotic and then look at the force time curves and see if you made a desirable change. The problem here is that you need to know what a desirable change looks like. The only way you could know that is if you had done a whole lot of experimentation. At this level you could experiment on a lot of variables before you stumbled upon one that does work, if there is one. You could listen to someone who has done a whole lot of experimentation and do what they do. You would have to trust that they got it right.

    Another level of knowledge is you understand the output of the force platform and the physics involved in gait. Then theorize on what an improved gait looks like and then do the testing. etc etc.

    Eric
     
  4. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    That's the way to do it Eric IMO :good:

    Dave
     
  5. JHZ123

    JHZ123 Welcome New Poster

    Thanks both.
    So you are saying I should read "physics for dummies"!

    I do tend to look at the force time curve to help me in my prescription. I try to look at it to help me change the timing of the foot in its cycle where necessary.
     
  6. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    That's good, what is it you look for and how do you change it?
     
  7. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I'm saying you should make rational decisions. Why do you think force time curve is useful for making orthotic changes?

    Eric
     
  8. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    As has been said many times on here, if you tell us who you are and which Country you're from you will find the forum generally more helpful (thanks Dave).

    Changing force/time integrals to more "normal" with orthotics is great - if you know what normal is.
    Is it only normal on your clinic floor or is it normal on other terrain?
    Is it normal when the subject runs or walks quickly?
    Did you take diurnal variation into account?

    If you find out what normal is could you let me know?
     
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