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Management of Calf Strains (Tennis Leg)

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 14, 2012.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Evidence Based Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)
     
  2. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    I did see a calf strain case recently but it was the result of the parents putting to much stress on it (increased stress = increased strain). Parents can be pushy but this mother was a right cow and the beefy father was full of bull.:D

    Luv Dave ;)
     
  3. Bruce Williams

    Bruce Williams Well-Known Member

    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    I'd say boo, but mooo is probably a better reply to that!
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    Mechanisms for triceps surae injury in high performance front row rugby union players: a kinematic analysis of scrummaging drills.
    Flavell CA, Sayers MG, Gordon SJ, Lee JB.
    J Sports Sci Med. 2013 Mar 1;12(1):159-64.
     
  5. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  6. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    The inital article seems to miss out an important final stage in the management of calf muscle strains, ie specific calf muscle strength training and conditioning. Although it possibly hints at it in one of the final statements "Once these milestones have been reached, more advanced exercises can be incorporated under the supervision of a rehabilitation expert, who specializes in working with endurance athletes".

    There would seem to be room for an ongoing programme containing: progressive Alfredson's eccentric exercises and plyometrics, at least.

    Without a calf muscle specific ongoing conditioning and strengthening programme re-injury is always just around the corner.

    Of course if it was alwa
     
  7. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    The inital article seems to miss out an important final stage in the management of calf muscle strains, ie specific calf muscle strength training and conditioning. Although it possibly hints at it in one of the final statements "Once these milestones have been reached, more advanced exercises can be incorporated under the supervision of a rehabilitation expert, who specializes in working with endurance athletes".

    There would seem to be room for an ongoing programme containing: progressive Alfredson's eccentric exercises and plyometrics, at least.

    Without a calf muscle specific, ongoing, conditioning and strengthening programme re-injury is just around the corner.

    Bill
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    Acute Compartment Syndrome After Medial Gastrocnemius Tear
    Yan Kit Sit and Tun Hing Lui,
    Foot Ankle Spec July 21, 2014
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    Acute Compartment Syndrome after Gastrocnemius Rupture (Tennis Leg) in a Nonathlete without Trauma
    Li Tao, MD, Huang Jun, MD, Ding Muliang, MD, Song Deye, MD, Ni Jiangdong, MD
    The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery; Articles in Press
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Re: Management of Calf Strains (“Tennis Leg”)

    Return to Play After Soleus Muscle Injuries
    Carles Pedret et al
    Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine July 2015 vol. 3 no. 7
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Re: Management of Calf Strains (Tennis Leg?)

    Tennis Leg: A Unique “Strain”, Management Approach and
    Review of the Literature

    Mahdi Y Khalfaoui, Anthony McEvoy
    Int. J. of Orth. 2016 February 23 3(1): 515-518
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    “Tennis leg”: gastrocnemius injury is a far more common cause than plantaris rupture
    Joelle R. Harwin, BS, Dr Michael L. Richardson, MD
    Radiology Case Reports; 29 November 2016
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    MRI assessment of calf injuries in Australian Football League players: findings that influence return to play
    Waterworth, G., Wein, S., Gorelik, A. et al.
    Skeletal Radiol (2017) 46: 343. doi:10.1007/s00256-016-2564-7
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Calf muscle strain injuries in sport: a systematic review of risk factors for injury
    Green B, Pizzari T
    Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 04 March 2017. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097177
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Calf muscle strain injuries in sport: a systematic review of risk factors for injury
    Brady Green, Tania Pizzari
    Br J Sports Med 2017;51:1189-1194.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Connective tissue injury in calf muscle tears and return to play: MRI correlation
    Ashutosh Prakash et al
    Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 26 October 2017
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Off the Courts: Occupational “Tennis Leg”
    Sandra J. Domeracki, MSN, FNP-BC, COHN-S, Zachary Landman, MD MPH, Paul D. Blanc, MD MSPH, ...
    Workplace Health & Safety August 30, 2018
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Calf muscle strain injuries in elite Australian Football players: a descriptive epidemiological evaluation
    B Green M Lin A G Schache J McClelland A Semciw A Rotstein J Cook T Pizzari
    : 08 September 2019
     
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