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Midfoot mobility and the windlass mechanism

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by scotfoot, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member


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    Can glycation caused by diabetes , or arthritis , reduce mid foot mobility and so inhibit the functioning of the windlass mechanism ?
    Can functional hallux limitus be caused by lack of midfoot mobility in some cases ?

    Any thoughts

    Gerry
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    With regard to the above I have looked at a few sites advocating techniques for improving midfoot mobility but don't see much about techniques that might involve gently flexing the foot in the way that the windlass would , and so perhaps improving mobility in that way . Are these techniques that are used ?
     
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    I am not a fan of the short foot exercise since it may reduce plantar pressures under the toes during gait . However , the exercise does seem to provide some benefits .
    I wonder if the benefits may actually be related to improved midfoot mobility , especially during toe off , rather than to increased intrinsic muscle strength .
    The exercise involves repeatedly lifting the midfoot relative the the forefoot and hindfoot areas .
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    I'm not convinced running barefoot on concrete is a good idea , but the video linked to below shows a midfoot strike with the force attenuating effects of the initial windlass phase being clearly demonstrated . Prior to foot strike the toes are dorsiflexed and the arch of the foot is more pronounced than it would be at rest . Midfoot flexibility is required to achieve this .

    Really good video of the initial windlass phase .

    Also , that foot looks like a pretty robust structure compared to most .

    Slow Motion Barefoot Running - YouTube


    www.youtube.com/watch?v=EThWIGMA82Y
    [​IMG]▶ 0:07

    25 Sep 2009 - Uploaded by Peter LarsonHigh-speed video of running barefoot. Nice mid-foot ... 1:36. Haile Gebrselassie slowmotion - Duration: 1 ...
     
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