Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

New foot remains from the Gran Dolina-TD6 Early Pleistocene site

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Aug 28, 2012.

Tags:
  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    New foot remains from the Gran Dolina-TD6 Early Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain).
    Pablos A, Lorenzo C, Martínez I, Bermúdez de Castro JM, Martinón-Torres M, Carbonell E, Arsuaga JL.
    J Hum Evol. 2012 Aug 23.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Homo antecessor

    Homo antecessor (Latin "pioneer") is an archaic human species recorded in the Spanish Sierra de Atapuerca, a productive archaeological site, from 1.2 to 0.8 million years ago during the Early Pleistocene. Populations of this species may have been present elsewhere in Western Europe, and were among the first to colonise that region of the world (hence, the name). The first fossils were found in the Gran Dolina cave in 1994, and the species was formally described in 1997 as the last common ancestor of modern humans and Neanderthals, supplanting the more conventional H. heidelbergensis in this position. H. antecessor has since been reinterpreted as an offshoot, though probably one branching off just before the modern human/Neanderthal split.

    Despite being so ancient, the face conspicuously parallels the morphology seen in modern humans rather than other archaic humans — namely in its overall flatness as well as the curving of the cheekbone as it merges into the upper jaw — though these elements are known only from a juvenile specimen. Various stature estimates range from 162.3–186.8 cm (5 ft 4 in–6 ft 2 in). H. antecessor may have been broad-chested and rather heavy, much like Neanderthals, though the limbs were proportionally long, a trait more frequent in tropical populations. The kneecaps are thin and have poorly developed tendon attachments. The feet indicate H. antecessor was walking and transmitting body weight differently than modern humans do.

    H. antecessor was predominantly manufacturing simple pebbles and flakes out of quartz and chert, though they used a variety of materials. This industry may represent a precursor to the Acheulean industry, which later became ubiquitous across Western Eurasia and Africa. Groups may have been dispatching hunting parties, which mainly targeted deer in their savanna and mixed-woodland environment. Many of the H. antecessor specimens were cannibalised, perhaps as a cultural practice or to survive severe famine. There is no evidence they were using fire, and they consequently only inhabited inland Iberia during warm periods, presumably retreating to the coast otherwise.

     
  4. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Earlier reference on this:
    Earliest humans in Europe: the age of TD6 Gran Dolina, Atapuerca, Spain
    Falguères, Christophe; J. Bahain; Y. Yokoyama, J. Arsuaga, J. Bermudez de Castro, E. Carbonell, J. Bischoff and J. Dolo
    Journal of Human Evolution 37 (3-4): 343-352 (351) 1999
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A Neandertal foot phalanx from the Galería de las Estatuas site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).
    Pablos A et al
    Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018 Oct 23.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Neandertal foot remains from Regourdou 1 (Montignac-sur-Vézère, Dordogne, France).
    Pablos A et al
    J Hum Evol. 2019 Mar;128:17-44
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Early Upper Paleolithic human foot bones from Manot Cave, Israel.
    Borgel S et al
    J Hum Evol. 2019 Oct 16
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Snapshots of human anatomy, locomotion, and behavior from Late Pleistocene footprints at Engare Sero, Tanzania
    Kevin G. Hatala, William E. H. Harcourt-Smith, Adam D. Gordon, Brian W. Zimmer, Brian G. Richmond, Briana L. Pobiner, David J. Green, Adam Metallo, Vince Rossi & Cynthia M. Liutkus-Pierce
    Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 7740 (2020)
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Morphological Affinity of the Early Pleistocene Footprints From Happisburgh, England, With Other Footprints of Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene Age
    Ashleigh L A Wiseman et al
    J Hum Evol. 2020 Jun 3
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Footprint evidence of early hominin locomotor diversity at Laetoli, Tanzania
    Ellison J McNutt et al
    Nature. 2021 Dec 1
     
Loading...

Share This Page