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Newton Running Shoes

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by nicpod1, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. nicpod1

    nicpod1 Active Member


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    Hi guys,

    Has anyone got any experience of Newton running shoes / Newton running style?

    The link to the site is below:

    http://www.newtonrunning.com/how-they-work

    A Physio I work with is a triathlete and apparently, they are taking the triathlon world by storm (as did the Pose running technique).

    Has anyone used them? As far as I can see, they are a heel lift with a rocker sole, but they seem to be talking a lot about actuators in the mid-sole replacing foam / EVA etc. I have asked them for more biomechanical details in relation to how they are meant to work, but just wondered if any of you have already tried them?

    Thanks!
     
  2. I looked at these about 18 months ago. As far as I could work out from their patent its basically along similar lines to McMahon's tuned running shoes; the springs in McMahon's design being replaced by the "actuators".

    You should read around the subject of surface stiffness.
     
  3. Karen Knightly

    Karen Knightly Active Member

    There's a very interesting article on the Newton shoe in February's issue of 220 Triathlon magazine, worth a look.

    Karen
     
  4. nicpod1

    nicpod1 Active Member

    Hi Simon,

    I have now read the 2 articles you posted on the arena from MacMahon and Shorten on surface stiffness and cushioning, which were really interesting, but, as I'm totally procrastinating by typing this rather than typing the patient letters I am actually meant to be doing right now, I'm going to attempt to condense the info and ask you a, probable, stupid question:

    Condensed version: Surface stiffness is important to energy efficiency in running (very condensed version) and cushioning does not automatically mean reduced plantar pressure (sorry, very, very condensed).

    MacMahons ideas focused on a dynamic midsole that would 'attenuate shock' and provide 'stability'.

    As far as I can see, the Newton running shoes have a springy heel and 'attenuated / dynamic' midsole that will help energy efficiency by loading onto the forefoot more rapidly and, I assume, reducing the impact of surface stiffness.

    My confusion lies in this ongoing claim with these things lately about simulating barefoot running whilst in a shoe. The theory being that running barefoot you would run more on your forefoot, which is certainly what I do when I've tried running barefoot, but, given that we wear shoes and, therefore, are able to heel strike without fracturing our heels against the tarmac, is it desirable to want to simulate this, which seems to have nothing to do with surface stifness and the like!

    I've probably not grasped this at all, Simon, so, I apologise, but, in your opinion, are the Newton Running shoes something that you would consider looking at further for runner patients and, biomechanically, what would you be suggesting them for?

    Thanks Simon!

    P.S. Karen, I can't read the triathlon mag from their internet site, could you post a summary of what they are saying about the shoes in the article? I assume it's all positive, knowing the way these things tend to get hyped up, but have people actually used them for long enough to ascertain their benefits? Thanks Karen!
     
  5. Steve The Footman

    Steve The Footman Active Member

    I think the Pose method is a long way from taking the triathlon world by storm. Most triathletes would not have any heard of it. The actual triathletes that run with the Pose method would be a fraction of a percent. The market share of Newton shoes is much less than that. Are they only a gimic? I guess time and sales will eventually tell. My question about the shoes could also be asked of the Pose method and all the other forefoot/midfoot striking theories out there.

    Are all humans designed so homogenously that a single method of running is the best for everyone?
     
  6. Aussie_Bec

    Aussie_Bec Member

    i have a military doctor who raves about them and lots of our shared patients are trying them out. My question though is are they any better than what we have on the market in Australia and much more easily accessible. From what i've heard these runners cost around $300 AU so are they worth it?
     
  7. CraigT

    CraigT Well-Known Member

    True- have you ever read a negative review in one of these mags?

    No. A simple argument which is conveniently ignored.
     
  8. Haven't run in a Newton shoe yet, but I have a a few things that need to be said about new shoes and the "Pose method" of forefoot striking running:

    1. Not all runners need to strike on their forefoot to be the most efficient runners. For the majority of long distance runners at their normal training speeds, rearfoot striking is the preferred manner of running.

    2. Trying to make someone who is naturally a rearfoot striker into a forefoot striker may injure them.

    3. The same runner who is a rearfoot striker at 8:00 min/mile pace may be a forefoot striker at 4:30 min/mile pace. Running speed changes foot strike pattern.

    4. To say that forefoot striking running is more energy efficient, and produces fewer injuries than rearfoot striking running is nothing more than marketing hype, with not a shred of scientific evidence, that is being promoted by know-nothings that are trying to make a living (Pose method, Chi running, etc) by trying to train naturally rearfoot striking runners into forefoot strikers.

    5. Runners with restricted ankle joint dorsiflexion with their knee flexed (less than 10 degrees ankle joint dorsiflexion with their knee flexed) will naturally tend to be forefoot strikers. Runners with over 15 degrees of ankle joint dorsiflexion with their knee flexed will tend to be rearfoot striking runners, all other parameters being equal.

    6. Just because someone is a triathlete does not mean they are also good runners, have good running form or have any special knowledge regarding running biomechanics.

    7. Every year, a new gimmick shoe is introduced that produces a lot of converts, a lot of positive testimonials, and then a lot of injuries, with the shoe becoming ancient history within the running community within a few years. If history is right then the Newton shoe will just be another one of the gimmick shoes that I have seen come and go in my last 37 years of following the running shoe industry.
     
  9. Steve The Footman

    Steve The Footman Active Member

    Excellent and comprehensive response Kevin.

    Perhaps it should be copied and pasted into the next forefoot strikers shoe thread that starts up.
     
  10. Mitchell P

    Mitchell P Member

    Hello Nicpod,
    I recently had the op to try the Newtons out, and as primarily a flat footed heel striking pronator, I was a tad sceptical whether these trainers could rescue me from the perils of the usual heavily cushioned motion controlled trainers that I prescribe myself. As it happened I was very suprised by the Newton 'Motion' range. As far as I'm aware, the Motions were designed for the more overly pronated foot type, it has a mid tarsal post which would prevent you from rolling over. Regarding my heel strike, the 'actuator lugs' located under the 1st - 5th Met promoted me to use it for primary initial contact. This removed my heel strike, increased my cadence as I was using less ground time and caused me to utilise my hamstrings and body weight to propel myself forward, reducing vertical lift. I can see how it will take time to master, it may not suit all, a strengthening plan for the calves is a must.
    Newtons approach is quite simple - minimise ground force reaction time, less resistance, more energy. Makes sense, but as we all know, technology is only half of it... run better!!

    Mitchell Phillips
    Strideuk
     
  11. Karen Knightly

    Karen Knightly Active Member

    Hi Nicpod,

    The article in 220 triathlon actually does seem to put forward a balanced viewpoint and is not all pro the Newton. They got one of the country's leading run shoe testers to try them and stated that any gait analysis expert would say he's not suited to them. It shows a still of his foot in mid-stance, apparently overpronating and he states that he found the Newton encouraged more forefoot striking at lower paces, but found that his feet became very tired on longer runs. He reckons they're fine for running fast over a short distance, but not for a slow, long plod!

    The article is actually discussing whether the Newton is right for triathlon and the viewpoints of olympic distance triathletes, their coaches and sports scientists all seems to reflect actually what Kevin has stated in his post.

    Karen
     
  12. mondul19

    mondul19 Member

    First time posting -- here goes...

    I was put onto the Newtons about 2 years ago by a patient -- interestingly enough, a triathlete. I purchased a pair and began running in them. I am a midfoot / forefoot striker for the most part (depending on the pace) and a Clydsdale weighing in at 197.

    The first thing I noticed after several miles on a crushed limestone trail was excessive pressure under the sesamoid complex on both feet. Hate to think what would have happened running on the asphalt streets.

    The energy return concept has to do with an intrinsic membrane which is loaded at heel lift, then propels the foot forward in late stance. At least that's the theory. I was too worried about developing sesamoiditis to go too far in them. I ground off the medial bump and it help a little in regard to sesamoid issues, but there was nothing really special about them that I could discern.

    I currently run in Brooks Infinities, and on my 4th pair. The little sliver of gel under the forefoot helps absorb shock quite well in my humble opinion. But I still wear the cool Newton cap out on the trail.

    Mark
     
  13. If the human Achilles tendon was a perfectly elastic structure, never developed structural tensile failures during repetetive use and was also not likely to develop inflammation/tendinosis/tears with increased eccentric loading strain rates that would be expected with such a negative heeled running shoe, then I would agree that the mechanical approach of the Newton shoe design would be "simple". However, being a long-time distance runner who has been sidelined on more than one occasion by Achilles tendinitis/tendinosis, and being a long-time sports podiatrist that treats Achilles tendinitis in runners on a daily basis, I can't recommend shoes like the Newton shoe since they will greatly increase the risk of runners developing these painful, pathological conditions of the Achilles tendon. As far as I'm concerned, it's not worth the risk of Achilles tendon injury for most runners to train in these types of shoes.

    Not all runners/triathletes find the Newton shoe to be so great. http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=2813112
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  14. planger

    planger Member

    Hello All,

    I've been following Newton from their start because I had a number of patients asking about them on a regular basis even before they were available for sale. The company has since sent me a few pair to run in and while I think they are interesting, I don't think they live up to the claims they make. And at a cost of $170 US per pair, I could buy 2 pairs of almost any other running shoe.

    Not surprisingly, the story about these shoes is really one of marketing and not so much of science. Best to look at their website to get the marketing "pitch" directly. Whether or not the actuators of the Newtons are revolutionary or if they even do what the company claims they do is debatable but frankly, I think, beside the point. As far as I'm concerned, the benefits of their "technology" is no different that Nike's Air, Asics' Gel, Saucony's Grid, ect.

    I believe it was E.C. Frederick who said that 80% of runner are heel strikers when wearing running shoes and Robert Lyden has written that most runners who run faster than 6:00 min/mile pace are mid to forefoot strikers. Because of the latter, many runners have become convinced that since the world class endurance athletes run on their forefoot then it means that they should too. Running coaches and advertising messages have led some to believe that by changing their running form they will become better runners. Not realizing that it is actually the other way around.

    A runners running form will naturally evolve as their as their power develops, their running economy improves and their pace increases. Just as a basketball player cannot expect to increase his vertical leap simply by switching shoes, a runner cannot expect to magically convert to a more efficient running form. The Newton is not capable of converting a heel striker to a forefoot striker - no shoe is unless it came with sharp upward pointing spikes implanted under the heel.

    I always emphasize to my patients that Nigg's and others research has shown that our bodies move in the way that is most metabolically efficient and causes the least pain. Anything that deviates from that preferred movement pattern will lead to fatigue and injury. So even though many of the best runners may land on their forefoot, it is likely that other runners are most metabilically efficient landing on their heel.

    Newton created a buzz in the triathlon community by getting their shoes on some pro and elite amateur triathletes before they were available to the public back in the fall of 2006. They were smart with their marketing because triathletes are a wealthier demographic than marathon runners and triathletes are notorious for their willingness to pay ridiculous amounts of money for gear with unproven benefits (just go to your local races and look for the back-of-the-pack triathletes who are 10-30 lbs. overweight yet wearing a $250 time trial helmet and riding an $8,000 bike). Newton has been very savvy with their public relations but eventually I think the early adaptors will start asking themselves if the shoes are really worth the cost.
     
  15. Paul:

    Excellent posting!:good:

    Welcome to Podiatry Arena and please continue to contribute.
     
  16. Steve The Footman

    Steve The Footman Active Member

    I say the same thing to my patients about Nigg's and others research!

    Many of them come to me wanting to change their running style and there are an increasing number who seem to want to jump on the forefoot strikers bandwagon. I try to emphasise that the only reason they should look at changing their running style is if it is contributing to their injuries. This is much rarer than most people think. It is also much harder to change than most runners expect. Training sensibly, getting the right shoes and addressing poor biomechanics will have a much greater impact on both their performance and their injury risk.

    The idea that everyone should run the same way, whether it is forefoot striking or heel striking, is wrong. The variation in human anatomy, structure and function should be reflected in the variation in running styles.
     
  17. planger

    planger Member

    originally posted by Steve The Footman
    I agree Steve, which brings us back to the Pose running technique which was mentioned in the first post of this thread. Nicholas Romanov who developed and trademarked the technique was involved in a few studies along with others including Tim Noakes. While his technique does lower the eccentric loading of the knee it also decreased running economy when compared to mid and rearfoot strike patterns in trained runners.

    I know that Irene Davis has been doing some interesting research on gait manipulation in runners but I think she has been focussing more on faulty biomechanics and individually prescribed programs as opposed to Romanov's approach where everybody is expected to run with the same form.
     
  18. CraigT

    CraigT Well-Known Member

    Does anyone have a copy of this research, or at least a reference? I have heard this, but only second hand...
     
  19. planger

    planger Member

    Craig,

    Check out this link to the abstract the most recent study I could find. Scroll to the reference list which has a number of excellent studies.

    Tseh, W, Caputo, J, Morgan, D, Influence of gait manipulation on running economy in female distance runners, JSSM, 2008 7:1 91-95.

    http://www.jssm.org/vol7/n1/13/v7n1-13text.php

    Paul
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 3, 2009
  20. CraigT

    CraigT Well-Known Member

    Thanks Paul
    I am particularly interested in Nigg's study as mentioned- I have never been able to find anyhting about 'preferred motion pathway', but maybe I haven't looked hard enough...
     
  21. Craig:

    Here are the references for Benno Nigg's preferred motion pathway model:

    Nigg BM, Nurse MA, Stefanyshyn DJ: Shoe inserts and orthotics for sport and physical activities. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 31(Suppl):S421-S428, 1999.

    Nigg BM: The role of impact forces and foot pronation: a new paradigm. Clin J Sport Med, 11:2-9, 2001.

    It is now 10 years old.
     
  22. Craig,
    Here's the rest:
    All Publications
    2008: von Tscharner Vinzenz; Nigg Benno M
    Last word on point:counterpoint: spectral properties of the surface EMG can characterize/do not provide information about motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle fiber type.
    Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 2008;105(5):1682.
    2008: von Tscharner Vinzenz; Nigg Benno M
    Point: spectral properties of the surface EMG can characterize/do not provide information about motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle fiber type.
    Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 2008;105(5):1671-3.
    2007: Valderrabano Victor; Nigg Benno M; von Tscharner Vinzenz; Stefanyshyn Darren J; Goepfert Beat; Hintermann Beat
    Gait analysis in ankle osteoarthritis and total ankle replacement.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 2007;22(8):894-904.
    2007: Boyer Katherine A; Nigg Benno M
    Changes in muscle activity in response to different impact forces affect soft tissue compartment mechanical properties.
    Journal of biomechanical engineering 2007;129(4):594-602.
    2007: Valderrabano Victor; Nigg Benno M; von Tscharner Vinzenz; Frank Cyril B; Hintermann Beat
    J. Leonard Goldner Award 2006. Total ankle replacement in ankle osteoarthritis: an analysis of muscle rehabilitation.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2007;28(2):281-91.
    2007: Valderrabano Victor; Nigg Benno M; Hintermann Beat; Goepfert Beat; Dick Walter; Frank Cyril B; Herzog Walter; von Tscharner Vinzenz
    Muscular lower leg asymmetry in middle-aged people.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2007;28(2):242-9.
    2007: Boyer Katherine A; Nigg Benno M
    Quantification of the input signal for soft tissue vibration during running.
    Journal of biomechanics 2007;40(8):1877-80.
    2006: Boyer Katherine A; Nigg Benno M
    Muscle tuning during running: implications of an un-tuned landing.
    Journal of biomechanical engineering 2006;128(6):815-22.
    2006: Valderrabano Victor; von Tscharner Vinzenz; Nigg Benno M; Hintermann Beat; Goepfert Beat; Fung Tak S; Frank Cyril B; Herzog Walter
    Lower leg muscle atrophy in ankle osteoarthritis.
    Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society 2006;24(12):2159-69.
    2006: Nigg Benno M; Emery Carolyn; Hiemstra Laurie A
    Unstable shoe construction and reduction of pain in osteoarthritis patients.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2006;38(10):1701-8.
    2006: Valderrabano V; Hintermann B; von Tscharner V; Göpfert B; Dick W; Nigg B M
    [Muscle biomechanics in total ankle replacement]
    Der Orthopäde 2006;35(5):513-20.
    2006: Mündermann Anne; Wakeling James M; Nigg Benno M; Humble R Neil; Stefanyshyn Darren J
    Foot orthoses affect frequency components of muscle activity in the lower extremity.
    Gait & posture 2006;23(3):295-302.
    2006: Nigg Benno; Hintzen Sabrina; Ferber Reed
    Effect of an unstable shoe construction on lower extremity gait characteristics.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 2006;21(1):82-8.
    2006: Boyer Katherine A; Nigg Benno M
    Soft tissue vibrations within one soft tissue compartment.
    Journal of biomechanics 2006;39(4):645-51.
    2005: Nurse Matthew A; Hulliger Manuel; Wakeling James M; Nigg Benno M; Stefanyshyn Darren J
    Changing the texture of footwear can alter gait patterns.
    Journal of electromyography and kinesiology : official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology 2005;15(5):496-506.
    2004: Boyer Katherine A; Nigg Benno M
    Muscle activity in the leg is tuned in response to impact force characteristics.
    Journal of biomechanics 2004;37(10):1583-8.
    2003: Valderrabano Victor; Hintermann Beat; Nigg Benno M; Stefanyshyn Darren; Stergiou Pro
    Kinematic changes after fusion and total replacement of the ankle: part 3: Talar movement.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2003;24(12):897-900.
    2003: Valderrabano Victor; Hintermann Beat; Nigg Benno M; Stefanyshyn Darren; Stergiou Pro
    Kinematic changes after fusion and total replacement of the ankle: part 2: Movement transfer.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2003;24(12):888-96.
    2003: Valderrabano Victor; Hintermann Beat; Nigg Benno M; Stefanyshyn Darren; Stergiou Pro
    Kinematic changes after fusion and total replacement of the ankle: part 1: Range of motion.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2003;24(12):881-7.
    2003: Wakeling James M; Liphardt Anna-Maria; Nigg Benno M
    Muscle activity reduces soft-tissue resonance at heel-strike during walking.
    Journal of biomechanics 2003;36(12):1761-9.
    2003: Mündermann Anne; Nigg Benno M; Humble R Neil; Stefanyshyn Darren J
    Orthotic comfort is related to kinematics, kinetics, and EMG in recreational runners.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2003;35(10):1710-9.
    2003: von Tscharner Vinzenz; Goepfert Beat; Nigg Benno M
    Changes in EMG signals for the muscle tibialis anterior while running barefoot or with shoes resolved by non-linearly scaled wavelets.
    Journal of biomechanics 2003;36(8):1169-76.
    2003: Nigg B M; Stefanyshyn D; Cole G; Stergiou P; Miller J
    The effect of material characteristics of shoe soles on muscle activation and energy aspects during running.
    Journal of biomechanics 2003;36(4):569-75.
    2003: Mündermann Anne; Nigg Benno M; Humble R Neil; Stefanyshyn Darren J
    Foot orthotics affect lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during running.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 2003;18(3):254-62.
    2003: Nigg Benno M; Stergiou Pro; Cole Gerald; Stefanyshyn Darren; Mündermann Anne; Humble Neil
    Effect of shoe inserts on kinematics, center of pressure, and leg joint moments during running.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2003;35(2):314-9.
    2002: Hintermann Beat; Valderrabano Victor; Nigg Benno
    Influence of screw type on obtained contact area and contact force in a cadaveric subtalar arthrodesis model.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2002;23(11):986-91.
    2002: Wakeling James M; Pascual Silvia A; Nigg Benno M
    Altering muscle activity in the lower extremities by running with different shoes.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2002;34(9):1529-32.
    2002: Wakeling James M; Nigg Benno M; Rozitis Antra I
    Muscle activity damps the soft tissue resonance that occurs in response to pulsed and continuous vibrations.
    Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 2002;93(3):1093-103.
    2002: Mündermann Anne; Nigg Benno M; Stefanyshyn Darren J; Humble R Neil
    Development of a reliable method to assess footwear comfort during running.
    Gait & posture 2002;16(1):38-45.
    2002: Schöllhorn W I; Nigg B M; Stefanyshyn D J; Liu W
    Identification of individual walking patterns using time discrete and time continuous data sets.
    Gait & posture 2002;15(2):180-6.
    2001: Wakeling J M; Pascual S A; Nigg B M; von Tscharner V
    Surface EMG shows distinct populations of muscle activity when measured during sustained sub-maximal exercise.
    European journal of applied physiology 2001;86(1):40-7.
    2001: Nurse M A; Nigg B M
    The effect of changes in foot sensation on plantar pressure and muscle activity.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 2001;16(9):719-27.
    2001: Mündermann A; Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Relationship between footwear comfort of shoe inserts and anthropometric and sensory factors.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2001;33(11):1939-45.
    2001: Wakeling J M; Von Tscharner V; Nigg B M; Stergiou P
    Muscle activity in the leg is tuned in response to ground reaction forces.
    Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 2001;91(3):1307-17.
    2001: Wakeling J M; Nigg B M
    Soft-tissue vibrations in the quadriceps measured with skin mounted transducers.
    Journal of biomechanics 2001;34(4):539-43.
    2001: Stacoff A; Reinschmidt C; Nigg B M; Van Den Bogert A J; Lundberg A; Denoth J; Stüssi E
    Effects of shoe sole construction on skeletal motion during running.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2001;33(2):311-9.
    2001: Wakeling J M; Nigg B M
    Modification of soft tissue vibrations in the leg by muscular activity.
    Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 2001;90(2):412-20.
    2001: Nigg B M
    The role of impact forces and foot pronation: a new paradigm.
    Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine 2001;11(1):2-9.
    2001: Nigg B M; Wakeling J M
    Impact forces and muscle tuning: a new paradigm.
    Exercise and sport sciences reviews 2001;29(1):37-41.
    2000: Stacoff A; Nigg B M; Reinschmidt C; van den Bogert A J; Lundberg A
    Tibiocalcaneal kinematics of barefoot versus shod running.
    Journal of biomechanics 2000;33(11):1387-95.
    2000: Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Energy aspects associated with sport shoes.
    Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin 2000;14(3):82-9.
    2000: Reinschmidt C; Nigg B M
    Current issues in the design of running and court shoes.
    Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin 2000;14(3):71-81.
    2000: Miller J E; Nigg B M; Liu W; Stefanyshyn D J; Nurse M A
    Influence of foot, leg and shoe characteristics on subjective comfort.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2000;21(9):759-67.
    2000: Wright I C; Neptune R R; van den Bogert A J; Nigg B M
    The influence of foot positioning on ankle sprains.
    Journal of biomechanics 2000;33(5):513-9.
    2000: Stacoff A; Nigg B M; Reinschmidt C; van den Bogert A J; Lundberg A; Stüssi E; Denoth J
    Movement coupling at the ankle during the stance phase of running.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 2000;21(3):232-9.
    2000: Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Influence of midsole bending stiffness on joint energy and jump height performance.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2000;32(2):471-6.
    2000: Wright I C; Neptune R R; van den Bogert A J; Nigg B M
    The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 2000;32(2):260-5.
    2000: Liu W; Nigg B M
    A mechanical model to determine the influence of masses and mass distribution on the impact force during running.
    Journal of biomechanics 2000;33(2):219-24.
    2000: Stacoff A; Reinschmidt C; Nigg B M; van den Bogert A J; Lundberg A; Denoth J; Stüssi E
    Effects of foot orthoses on skeletal motion during running.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 2000;15(1):54-64.
    1999: Sasse M; Nigg B M; Stefanyshyn D J
    Tibiotalar motion--effect of fibular displacement and deltoid ligament transection: in vitro study.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1999;20(11):733-7.
    1999: Nurse M A; Nigg B M
    Quantifying a relationship between tactile and vibration sensitivity of the human foot with plantar pressure distributions during gait.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 1999;14(9):667-72.
    1999: Nigg B M; Liu W
    The effect of muscle stiffness and damping on simulated impact force peaks during running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1999;32(8):849-56.
    1999: Nigg B M; Nurse M A; Stefanyshyn D J
    Shoe inserts and orthotics for sport and physical activities.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1999;31(7 Suppl):S421-8.
    1999: Lee S; Muller C C; Stefanyshyn D; Nigg B M
    Relative forefoot abduction and its relationship to foot length in vitro.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 1999;14(3):193-202.
    1999: van den Bogert A J; Read L; Nigg B M
    An analysis of hip joint loading during walking, running, and skiing.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1999;31(1):131-42.
    1998: Hintermann B; Nigg B M
    Pronation in runners. Implications for injuries.
    Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) 1998;26(3):169-76.
    1998: Wright I C; Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Prevention of ankle injuries.
    Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) 1998;26(1):59-61.
    1998: Nigg B M; Khan A; Fisher V; Stefanyshyn D
    Effect of shoe insert construction on foot and leg movement.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1998;30(4):550-5.
    1998: Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Contribution of the lower extremity joints to mechanical energy in running vertical jumps and running long jumps.
    Journal of sports sciences 1998;16(2):177-86.
    1997: de Koning J J; Nigg B M; Gerritsen K G
    Assessment of the mechanical properties of area-elastic sport surfaces with video analysis.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1997;29(12):1664-8.
    1997: Stefanyshyn D J; Nigg B M
    Mechanical energy contribution of the metatarsophalangeal joint to running and sprinting.
    Journal of biomechanics 1997;30(11-12):1081-5.
    1997: Reinschmidt C; van den Bogert A J; Nigg B M; Lundberg A; Murphy N
    Effect of skin movement on the analysis of skeletal knee joint motion during running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1997;30(7):729-32.
    1997: Stähelin T; Nigg B M; Stefanyshyn D J; van den Bogert A J; Kim S J
    A method to determine bone movement in the ankle joint complex in vitro.
    Journal of biomechanics 1997;30(5):513-6.
    1996: van den Bogert A; Read L; Nigg B M
    A method for inverse dynamic analysis using accelerometry.
    Journal of biomechanics 1996;29(7):949-54.
    1996: Wiley J P; Nigg B M
    The effect of an ankle orthosis on ankle range of motion and performance.
    The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy 1996;23(6):362-9.
    1996: Sommer C; Hintermann B; Nigg B M; van den Bogert A J
    Influence of ankle ligaments on tibial rotation: an in vitro study.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1996;17(2):79-84.
    1995: Hintermann B; Nigg B M
    Influence of arthrodeses on kinematics of the axially loaded ankle complex during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1995;16(10):633-6.
    1995: Hintermann B; Sommer C; Nigg B M
    Influence of ligament transection on tibial and calcaneal rotation with loading and dorsi-plantarflexion.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1995;16(9):567-71.
    1995: Hintermann B; Nigg B M
    In vitro kinematics of the axially loaded ankle complex in response to dorsiflexion and plantarflexion.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1995;16(8):514-8.
    1995: Nigg B M; Nigg C R; Reinschmidt C
    Reliability and validity of active, passive and dynamic range of motion tests.
    Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin 1995;9(2):51-7.
    1995: Gerritsen K G; van den Bogert A J; Nigg B M
    Direct dynamics simulation of the impact phase in heel-toe running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1995;28(6):661-8.
    1995: Reinschmidt C; Nigg B M
    Influence of heel height on ankle joint moments in running.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1995;27(3):410-6.
    1995: Nigg B M; De Boer R W; Fisher V
    A kinematic comparison of overground and treadmill running.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1995;27(1):98-105.
    1995: Nigg B M; Anton M
    Energy aspects for elastic and viscous shoe soles and playing surfaces.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1995;27(1):92-7.
    1994: van den Bogert A J; Smith G D; Nigg B M
    In vivo determination of the anatomical axes of the ankle joint complex: an optimization approach.
    Journal of biomechanics 1994;27(12):1477-88.
    1994: Hintermann B; Nigg B M; Sommer C
    Foot movement and tendon excursion: an in vitro study.
    Foot & ankle international / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society 1994;15(7):386-95.
    1994: Hintermann B; Nigg B M
    [Movement transfer between foot and calf in vitro]
    Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin 1994;8(2):60-6.
    1993: Hintermann B; Nigg B M
    [Pronation from the viewpoint of the transfer of movement between the calcaneus and the tibia]
    Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Sportmedizin 1993;41(4):151-6.
    1993: Segesser B; Nigg B M
    [Orthopedic and biomechanical concepts of sports shoe construction]
    Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin 1993;7(4):150-62.
    1993: Cole G K; Nigg B M; Ronsky J L; Yeadon M R
    Application of the joint coordinate system to three-dimensional joint attitude and movement representation: a standardization proposal.
    Journal of biomechanical engineering 1993;115(4A):344-9.
    1993: Nigg B M; Cole G K; Nachbauer W
    Effects of arch height of the foot on angular motion of the lower extremities in running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1993;26(8):909-16.
    1993: Nigg B M
    Sports science in the twenty-first century.
    Journal of sports sciences 1993;11(4):343-7.
    1993: Grimston S K; Nigg B M; Hanley D A; Engsberg J R
    Differences in ankle joint complex range of motion as a function of age.
    Foot & ankle 1993;14(4):215-22.
    1992: Nachbauer W; Nigg B M
    Effects of arch height of the foot on ground reaction forces in running.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1992;24(11):1264-9.
    1992: Nigg B M; Fisher V; Allinger T L; Ronsky J R; Engsberg J R
    Range of motion of the foot as a function of age.
    Foot & ankle 1992;13(6):336-43.
    1992: Nigg B M; Segesser B
    Biomechanical and orthopedic concepts in sport shoe construction.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1992;24(5):595-602.
    1992: Bobbert M F; Yeadon M R; Nigg B M
    Mechanical analysis of the landing phase in heel-toe running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1992;25(3):223-34.
    1992: Hawes M R; Nachbauer W; Sovak D; Nigg B M
    Footprint parameters as a measure of arch height.
    Foot & ankle 1992;13(1):22-6.
    1991: Bobbert M F; Schamhardt H C; Nigg B M
    Calculation of vertical ground reaction force estimates during running from positional data.
    Journal of biomechanics 1991;24(12):1095-105.
    1990: Nigg B M; Skarvan G; Frank C B; Yeadon M R
    Elongation and forces of ankle ligaments in a physiological range of motion.
    Foot & ankle 1990;11(1):30-40.
    1990: Nigg B M
    The validity and relevance of tests used for the assessment of sports surfaces.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1990;22(1):131-9.
    1990: Motriuk H U; Nigg B M
    A technique for normalizing centre of pressure paths.
    Journal of biomechanics 1990;23(9):927-32.
    1990: Nigg B M; Bobbert M
    On the potential of various approaches in load analysis to reduce the frequency of sports injuries.
    Journal of biomechanics 1990;23 Suppl 1():3-12.
    1989: Herzog W; Nigg B M; Read L J; Olsson E
    Asymmetries in ground reaction force patterns in normal human gait.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1989;21(1):110-4.
    1988: Nigg B M; Yeadon M R; Herzog W
    The influence of construction strategies of sprung surfaces on deformation during vertical jumps.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1988;20(4):396-402.
    1988: Yeadon M R; Nigg B M
    A method for the assessment of area-elastic surfaces.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 1988;20(4):403-7.
    1988: Nigg B M; Segesser B
    The influence of playing surfaces on the load on the locomotor system and on football and tennis injuries.
    Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) 1988;5(6):375-85.
    1988: Herzog W; Nigg B M; Read L J
    Quantifying the effects of spinal manipulations on gait using patients with low back pain.
    Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics 1988;11(3):151-7.
    1988: Nigg B M; Herzog W; Read L J
    Effect of viscoelastic shoe insoles on vertical impact forces in heel-toe running.
    The American journal of sports medicine 1988;16(1):70-6.
    1987: Herzog W; Nigg B M; Robinson R O; Read L J
    Quantifying the effects of spinal manipulations on gait, using patients with low back pain: a pilot study.
    Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics 1987;10(6):295-9.
    1987: Robinson R O; Herzog W; Nigg B M
    Use of force platform variables to quantify the effects of chiropractic manipulation on gait symmetry.
    Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics 1987;10(4):172-6.
    1987: Nigg B M; Bahlsen H A; Luethi S M; Stokes S
    The influence of running velocity and midsole hardness on external impact forces in heel-toe running.
    Journal of biomechanics 1987;20(10):951-9.
    1987: Nigg B M; Yeadon M R
    Biomechanical aspects of playing surfaces.
    Journal of sports sciences 1987;5(2):117-45.
    1986: Nigg B M; Segesser B
    [The running shoe--a means of preventing running complaints]
    Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und ihre Grenzgebiete 1986;124(6):765-71.
    1982: Nigg B M; Luethi S; Segesser B; Stacoff A; Guidon H W; Schneider A
    [Sports show support inlays. A biomechanical comparison of three different types of arch support (author's transl)]
    Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und ihre Grenzgebiete 1982;120(1):34-9.
    1980: Segesser B; Nigg B M
    [Tibial insertion tendinoses, achillodynia, and damage due to overuse of the foot-etiology, biomechanics, therapy (author's transl)]
    Der Orthopäde 1980;9(3):207-14.
     
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    Here is a promotional video from Newton:

     
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  25. trijordan

    trijordan Welcome New Poster

    just curious- 2 and a half years after this thread was started... Is the podiatry view on the Newtons the same or has it changed? Did anyone ever get a chance to run in them?
     
  26. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    What do you mean by that? There is no such thing as "the podiatry view".
     
  27. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    I don't speak for 'podiatry', but think they are a good shoe for the people that they are made for. The problem is we are all now seeing a huge influx in running injuries in those who have transitioned to a shoe or running form that is not for them. There is so much propaganda associated with each of the different 'running forms' or styles....how can they all be "the best". At the end of the day, each runner should do what is best for them. Different running forms stress different tissues .... hey, but who am I to complain, all this is good for business!!!!
     
  28. leelas_star

    leelas_star Welcome New Poster

    I am a professional dancer and bought the Newton running shoes to train in. I liked that it put my weight forward because as a dancer, I am constantly up in a demi-point position. However, after 2 months of wear, it seems I have a small rupture of my right achilles tendon, right where it meets the calcaneus. I have had no direct trauma placed upon my foot, so it seems this was brought on gradually. I suspected the shoe, because after reading material on achilles injury and treatments, finding the right pair of shoes was imperative. Newton kept coming up as something to stay away from.
    I like the way these shoes look, and receive a lot of compliments, but it hasn't been worth the injury...obviously. I can't say for certain they are the cause, but it's far too coincidental to ignore.
     
  29. For runners who have suffered from the disabling effects of Achilles tendinitis/tendinosus, these shoes with a very low heel height differential (i.e. low heel drop) are probably the worst shoes they can run in. After all the hype has worn off, Newtons and other "minimalist shoes" will still be found to be associated with just as many injuries as traditional running shoes that typically have a 10-12 mm heel height differential....the only difference being that each running shoe design will cause different structural components of the runner's feet and lower extremities to become injured.

    As I have said many times before, it isn't the running shoe that causes running injuries; running as an activity, by itself, will increase the risk of injury regardless of what running shoe (or no shoe) is worn. Why is that so many people involved in these discussions has such difficulty comprehending this basic tissue stress concept?!:bang:
     
  30. Saw a triathlete last week who had suffered a metatarsal stress fracture after running in these. Highly cavoid foot, very laterally deviated STJ axis- one of Craig Tanners ex-patients. In the past Craig had given him some prefabs with a forefoot-midfoot valgus wedge which had sorted out his ITB woes. He's been running comfortably without orthoses for some time and wanted advice re: callus sub 1st MTPJ.

    In addition to providing a simple pressure relieving insole I told him to stop reading internet sites on "how to run" and stop following fads. I think he took it all on board. Nice fella' who says hello and thanks, Craig.
     
  31. Interestingly, I also had a runner come in my office yesterday who had injured himself running barefoot. Here was a really nice man , who had been running for over 20 years and, after reading "Born to Run" and taking a "Chi Running Class" had developed a chronic 2nd MPJ capsulitis with a mild plantar plate sprain. He had discovered that he probably shouldn't be running barefoot on his own, thank goodness.

    Therefore, I put an 1/8" felt pad on his shoe insole to accommodate the 2nd MPJ and showed him how to do digital plantarflexion taping which gave him immediate relief. Then he started asking about the "right way to run" and here is what I said, "Don't you think that after all the running you have done that you know how to run properly? Quit reading internet sites on the "proper way to run" and quit taking classes on "how to run properly" and just go out and listen to your body on what feels best to you. After all the running you have done, you certainly don't need anyone to tell you how to run!"

    Good to see that we think alike, Dr. Spooner.:drinks
     
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    Influence of midsole ‘actuator lugs’ on running economy in trained distance runners
    Matthew F. Moran & Beau K. Greer
    Footwear Science; Volume 5, Issue 2, 2013
     
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    A new footwear technology to promote non-heelstrike landing and enhance running performance: Fact or fad?
    Zhang JH et al
    J Sports Sci. 2017 Aug;35(15):1533-1537. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2016.122491
     
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