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Nutritional supplements and wound healing

Discussion in 'Diabetic Foot & Wound Management' started by hmccausl, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. hmccausl

    hmccausl Active Member


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    Hi all,
    We had a rep visit our department this afternoon to show us the Arginine + nutrition supplements available now. Apparantly the Arginine-only powders are easier for a patient with diabetes to incorporate into their diet, but they had no data except that for hospital pressure ulcers and that was with the full strength supplement (+zinc +vitC)

    My questions:
    Has anyone had some experience using these, and how did they go?
    Who purchased the supplements - the patients?

    On a similar note, what nutritional info or support do you provide for patients in your Ulcer/High Risk Foot Clincs? We have tried and failed to get a dietician on our team due to staff shortages, but an education handout is hopefully not far away.

    Thanks in advance for any replies,
    Helen
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    This is from 2004:

    Healing of diabetic foot ulcers in L-arginine-treated patients.
    Arana V, Paz Y, González A, Méndez V, Méndez JD.
    Biomed Pharmacother. 2004 Dec;58(10):588-97.
     
  3. Elizabeth Walsh

    Elizabeth Walsh Active Member

    HTML:
    On a similar note, what nutritional info or support do you provide for patients in your Ulcer/High Risk Foot Clincs? We have tried and failed to get a dietician on our team due to staff shortages, but an education handout is hopefully not far away
    I would be inclined to seek this information from a G.P. who has ACNEM training.

    The Australian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine.
    www.ACNEM.org

    This is the Australian equivalent of The Institute for Optimum Nutrition (ION).
    www.ion.ac.uk
    ION believe in covering all aspects of health, both orthodox and alternative in order to achieve a complete understanding of the subject.
     
  4. Elizabeth Walsh

    Elizabeth Walsh Active Member

    I know it is hard to get the oldies to get used to "new fangled" ideas, but with the nutrition, if you have a health food shop nearby, I would head in there get their advice,and see if they have cholorophyll, liquid preferably. It is recommended for those whose diets are lacking in natural green vegetables, it assists the healing of wounds and tissues.I prefer the chlorophyll brand Eva-K by Q Medicinals.

    Similarily, wheatgrass, liquid or powder is known for its ability to stimulate tissue growth and repair.
    Tahini, two tablespoons of which has equivalent protein to a large steak.It is rich in phosphorus, niacin, vitamin E, and has 10 times more calcium than cow's milk.

    Herbal capsules such as Ginkgo Biloba, Hawthorn or Grape seed are meant to assist in the maintenance of peripheral circulation.

    All of this of course should be checked with the G.P. and maybe a Naturopath to ensure no contraindications with current medications or diabetes ensue.
     
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