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Orthoses and muscle strength

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by cpoc103, Jun 21, 2019.

  1. cpoc103

    cpoc103 Active Member


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    Hi arena, it’s been a while since I last posted in here.
    I had a very interesting chat with a physio and an orthopaedic surgeon about the use of orthoses.
    The surgeon made an interesting comment that I’d really not given too much thought too and was wondering other people’s opinions.
    He reckoned that over time with the use of orths they have the potential to not only relieve stress on tissues but to also change their characteristics, inc the tendon.

    He believed that but reducing the stress on the affected tissues it will allow the tissues to first relax and repair, and then over time this effect will lead to the tissues gaining strength due to functioning in their correct/ preferred pathways.

    It was an interesting chat to say the least, especially as it was an orthopod, where as the physio believed the orthoses can merely relieve the stress but have no effect on tendon loading!!

    Be interested to hear some thoughts.

    Cheers
    Colin.
     
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  3. Yep Colin would agree with the ortho mostly.

    Would not use the terms he used but the idea is sound. The issue will be after awhile the loads on the tissue are not pathological but not increasing then the tissue will not get stronger just stay at the same levels.

    Not sure what to say to the Physio tbh

    Loads stress force
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I agree as well. I tend to look at the situation as there is a breakdown rate for a give stress and a healing rate of the body (for a given age). When the stress rate is higher than the healing rate you get overuse injuries. If the orthosis can reduce the breakdown rate below the healing rate, then the patient should heal. Once it's healed, continued stress can allow the body to increase strength in the tissues.
     
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