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Overuse injuries in cycling

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 17, 2010.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Overuse Injuries in Professional Road Cyclists
    Benjamin Clarsen, Tron Krosshaug, Roald Bahr
    American Journal of Sports Medicine (in press)
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of bicycle saddle height on knee injury risk and cycling performance.
    Bini R, Hume PA, Croft JL.
    Sports Med. 2011 Jun 1;41(6):463-76.
     
  3. One of the ways I try to determine optimum saddle height in my cyclist patients is to incrementally raise the saddle height until the pelvis starts rotating excessively within the frontal plane while doing seated cycling. This is best done on a wind-trainer in the office. I use the formula of 109% of inseam length (crotch to floor distance while in standing on floor in bike shoe) as the proper distance from the top of saddle to the top of the pedal at the bottom dead center position of the pedal cycle. Of course, it is probably much more complicated than that but this seems to have worked well for my cyclist patients in the past.

    Here is a nice little article discussing some of the mechanical considerations in making this determination.

    http://www.noncircularchainring.be/pdf/Biomechanical study - Project 003 Dead Centre.pdf
     
  4. David Wedemeyer

    David Wedemeyer Well-Known Member

    This is really good stuff Kevin thank you. I'm enjoying my road bike again after having a fitting and some tinkering! My left knee was beginning to get irritated and we changed a couple things, including the shoes. My last couple rides were much more comfortable, keeping my fingers crossed!
     
  5. David:

    One of the things I learned from Drs. Harry Hlavac and Bill Sanner during my Biomechanics Fellowship (26 years ago) is that it is best to evaluate the cyclist from in front of the bike (on wind trainer) and with video analysis (or careful visual analysis) of their frontal plane knee motion. Ideally, the knees should track nearly straight up and straight down, with little wasted side-to-side motion or in a very tight "figure of 8 pattern". As the loops of the "figure of 8" of the anterior knees become larger then we assumed cycling mechanics were worse and the knee strain was greater.

    Additionally, I have noted in feet with medially deviated STJ axes during cycling, that the knee will adduct fairly rapidly toward the top tube during the initiation of the power phase. Additionally, in more severe cases of varus forefoot deformities, the medial knee may even strike the top tube during the power phase. In these feet, a combination of a foot orthosis inside the cycling shoe and a varus wedge between the shoe cleat and the shoe sole makes a huge difference in cycling efficiency and comfort.
     
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