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Pigeon Toe Gait Corrected with Proprioceptive Insoles

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Brian A. Rothbart, Jan 11, 2021.

  1. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member


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    Take a look at this case study presented by Dr Gerald Smith and tell me what you think.

    Professor Rothbart
     
  2. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    This patient was fitted with proprioceptive insoles manufactured specifically for the Primus Metatarsus Supinatus foot disorder. Based on my research, I believe these insoles function by sending a proprioceptive signal to the cerebellum that instantaneously makes the correction in the angle of gait.
    These insoles must not be used on any other type of foot structure.
     
  3. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    I have found, during my 50+ years of clinical practice (and research) that a majority of adducted gait patterns in children is a compensatory mechanism. That is, the child adducts (subconsciously) to ameliorate the discomfort resulting from gravity drive (abnormal) pronation.

    To be more specific, I have found that torsional abnormalities in the femur or tibia are far less frequent as a cause of adduction (compared to the compensatory adduction resulting from hyperpronation).

    I have also found that two of the most common causes of gravity drive pronation are:
    • PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity and the
    • Primus Metatarsus Supinatus foot structure
    These children frequently exhibit an adducted gait pattern.

    In the above example, submitted by Dr Smith, you can visually see the dramatic attenuation of the adduction when the child wears the proprioceptive insoles.
     
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