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Plantar pressure with and without custom insoles in patients with common foot complaints

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 5, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Plantar pressure with and without custom insoles in patients with common foot complaints.
    Stolwijk NM, Louwerens JW, Nienhuis B, Duysens J, Keijsers NL.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2011 Jan;32(1):57-65.
     
  2. annatudse

    annatudse Welcome New Poster

    My first post ;/)

    After reading Sponners,Smiths & Kirby's article ; In shoe Pressure Measurement and Foot Orthosis research, 2010,
    (.....which by the way totally challenged my basic mechanics and mathematical skills and gave me a massive headache!!!)

    What i got out of this article was that In shoe pressure measurement systems can't be adapted to evaluate FO in forms of force, pressure etc due to 2D limitations of the sensors and curvature of the orthoses.

    I have now read the article posted article by Stolwijk et al. 2011 and i got be wondering about the methods they used in this study?

    If I have understood it right from the geometry of the insoles (low and high arches) will have big impact on the directions and magnitude of the normal forces and the limitations of the in shoe sensors when calculating the COP.

    And as Sponner, Smith and Kirby, 2010 stated in the paper “do the researcher or clinician really know where the pressure……, is actually located at the real foot orthosis interface…”?
    The researchers (Stolwijk et al.) used a 3D plantar scanner (Precision 3D limited, UK) to measure the insole shape in the current study, could it be possible to measure the exact location of each discreet force application area in combination with any given in shoe pressure measurement insole???
    As i understood the researchers scanned the insole (3D) during static conditions, do not the geometry of insoles change during dynamic conditions (walking)?
     
  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Yes, you are right, there are a number of problems with using plantar pressures as the variable of interest when looking at foot orthotics. Some of those issues where addressed in Simon's paper.

    Pressure is a good variable of intersest if you want to off-load and pressure has been shown to be a risk factor for the problem under investigation (obviously in patients at risk for diabetes lesions).

    What I fail to undertsand about studies like the one above and many others, is that they want to measure the plantar pressure changes with foot orthotics in different conditions, yet plantar pressure patterns or changes have not been demonstrated as being a risk factor for the problem. I would have thought that you should be measuring changes with the foot orthotic of the factors that have been shown to be a risk factor.... otherwise the data/results generated is useful to no one.

    Even those who use plantar pressure measuring systems clinically for foot orthoses use, hardly ever look at pressure and focus more on factors such as timing of events.
     
  4. annatudse,

    I have not yet read the paper in question, although I suspect that your evaluation of their methodological weaknesses in light of our paper may well be applicable.

    Glad our paper challenged you and made you think. It clearly has had the desired effect since our goal was to make people aware of the limitations of in-shoe pressure measurement when employed in exactly this kind of research.
    :drinks

     
  5. Ian Linane

    Ian Linane Well-Known Member

    Is this paper of Simon, Kevin and Dave readily available?
     
  6. PM me your email and I'll send you a copy.
     
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