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Podiatric Health Education

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by greatwhite, Feb 12, 2008.

  1. greatwhite

    greatwhite Active Member


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    Hi, I'm wondering if anyone can help me. I am currently required to offer 'health education' talks to patients deemed as low/no risk within the NHS. I don't neccessarily believe these are the best method of educating the public (I'd prefer a 1 on 1 consultation), however I am required to offer said talks as part of a service agreement.

    Anyway, this is a long way about of me asking if anyone has any experience of conducting such a talk or if anyone has any links to resources/presentations or advice that may be of use.

    Thanks
     
  2. Ella Hurrell

    Ella Hurrell Active Member

    Re: Podiatric Health Ed

    By 'Health Education', do you mean basic self-help foot care? If so, The Society produce lots of booklets that are free to download (see http://www.feetforlife.org/foot_health/free_leaflets.html). Age concern produce a number of leaflets for free that are useful to distribute. They have one (or they certianly did until recently, called "Fitter Feet" which had some good tips. Hope that gives you somewhere to start.

    Ella
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  4. W J Liggins

    W J Liggins Well-Known Member

    You might like to look at the Institute of Chiropodists and Podiatrists web site where you will find a number of leaflets under 'publications' which offer advice at a lay persons level and might be of use.

    All the best

    Bill Liggins
     
  5. Cameron

    Cameron Well-Known Member

    greatwhite

    >Hi, I'm wondering if anyone can help me. I am currently required to offer 'health education' talks to patients deemed as low/no risk within the NHS. I don't neccessarily believe these are the best method of educating the public (I'd prefer a 1 on 1 consultation), however I am required to offer said talks as part of a service agreement.

    Yonks ago I got stuck into this and published a paper somewhere - The Chiropodist , I think, sometime in the 80s. I compared one to one consultations with group work and came up with the same conclusion about effectiveness (long term memory).

    Your colleagues have cited good reference material and there are oodles more on the net. Diabetes sites are especiallly thorough and more or less all are saying the same thing. Whether you are at risk or not matters not a jot (in my opinion) but working with so called 'minimum risk groups' is great experience and prepares you well to deal with others who are less fortunate.

    Having gone through the full gambet of preaching and entertaining (that was how I got started with my interest in the history of shoes), I would say I believe mini workshops are by far the most meaningful way to engage the audience. I attended a workshop held by a chap here in Australia (Justin Warnick) who devised foothealth workshop programs for Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders (SARRAH PROJECT http://www.sarrah.org.au/site/index.cfm) and have found his model to be extremely effective across the board. Have a swizz at the Indigenous Diabtetic Foot Program

    http://www.sarrah.org.au/site/index.cfm?display=65940

    Justin has spent a long time researching cheap household items which are both novel and useful in self examination and foot hygiene. He also has a collection of giveaways which includes a plastic bucket (for foot washing) and it is amazing how the audience warm to this.

    In summary workshops involve an evidence based approach:
    how to wash the feet (an inspect them for problems) -
    plastic bucket, water supply, compementary soap, lava stone or plastic pot scourer, drying cloth, inspection mirror (car), compelmentary cream.

    how best to care for the nails and skin.
    sample nippers and rasps etc for 'do's and don'ts.'

    simple testing for peripheral neuropathy
    monofilaments

    simple testing circulation
    hand held ultrasound

    what to do when the situation presents
    handouts including access addresses etc

    sharing stories about sore feet.
    Pictorial Images to aid discussion

    Plenty opportunity for audience participation and each component is supported by appropriate health information.

    These are always fun sessions and appear to be popular with groups who at the very minimum go away entertained.

    What ever you decide upon if you are not that experienced with public presentations it is always a good idea to make a simple lesson plan.

    Time allocation
    What the goup will achieve
    How you as facilitator will achieve this
    The resources you need

    Belive me , you will learn so much from the experience and whilst not at the forefront of clinical podiatry, the value to you as a clinician is beyond measure.

    enjoy
    toeslayer
     
  6. greatwhite

    greatwhite Active Member

    Thankyou all for the advice, particularly toeslayer. I will hopefully be providing sessions in a 'workshop' format. They won't/don't make up the bulk of my clinical time but the experience should be good, and hopefully of benefit to the patients. A lesson plan will be a definite for myself though until I get the hang of it.
     
  7. Elaine

    Elaine Member

    Just a quick correction.

    All credit must go to Jason Warnock in Townsville, Far North Queensland for the Indigenous Diabetic Foot Program you mention.

    Elaine
     
  8. Cameron

    Cameron Well-Known Member

    my apologies to Jason.

    toeslayer
    forget my head, if it was not stuck on.
     
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