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Preferred Management of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Preferred Management of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis Among Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons
    Benedict F. DiGiovanni, MD; Andrew M. Moore, MD; Jason P. Zlo
    Foot & Ankle International June 2012 (Vol. 33 #6) June 1, 2012
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. i-man

    i-man Member

    The study sited is interested, but I don't know of any patient that will put up with heel pain for 10 months and not seek another opinion.
    Assuming the cause of the heel pain is chronic plantar fascitis, I have injected PRP and placed patient in CAM walker with heat molded 1/2 inch plastazote machined to fit into foot bed of CAM walker. I have had great success. If this fails, and again, assuming other methods of non operative treatment fails, I do an EPF. I also question why a gastrocnemius lengthening, when 90% of recalcitrant heel pain is associated with a semi rigid cavus foot type.
     
  4. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

    Are you sure that that is the cause for 90% of recaltracent heel pain ?
     
  5. Kara47

    Kara47 Active Member

    I-Man,
    What are PRP & EPF?
    Which country do you practice in?
    I must say I've seen very little Plantar fasciitis in Pes cavus feet, usually normal/ low arch, but mostly in people who stand/ walk on hard surfaces.
    Looking forward to other suggestions, have had a run of Plantar fasciitis in past few weeks.
    Cheers,
    Kara.
     
  6. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    Google PRP for heel pain
    Google EPF for heel pain
     
  7. W J Liggins

    W J Liggins Well-Known Member

    I suppose that we all fall into the trap of using abbreviations from time to time; however, in the UK (and I assume Oz and NZ also) we are encouraged to desist from so doing. The reason is the potential for misinterpretation, and confusion in law suits. It does seem reasonable to ask, as did Kara - and subtly at that - that posters should be clear on this website. I am sure that he/she is well aware of what Platelet Rich Plasma is, as well as Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy but was wishing to bring this out for those who were unaware.

    TTFN

    Bill
     
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