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Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Arch Height

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes on the Basis of Foot Arch Height: Summary of Military Investigations
    Authors: Joseph J. Knapik, ScD, Daniel W. Trone, PhD, Juste Tchandja, MPH, Bruce H. Jones, MD
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 22 August 2014.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. efuller

    efuller MVP

    It's nice that tested the axiom that shoes should be based on arch height. The frustrating part for me is that there is no theory behind the idea. Why would one shoe be better for a low arched foot. They looked at stability, motion control, etc. without any theory on why one one shoe would be better for a high arch or a low arch.

    If you wanted to do research on shoes and injury you should look at the design changes in the shoe and how they alter mechanics and then compare that to how those design changes might alter stress on specific anatomical structures. It should not just be was there an injury, but was there a specific injury.

    Most anti pronation shoes are designed to shift the center under the heel more medially. This will reduce the pronation moment from the ground. This will theoretcially reduce the incidence of posterior tibial tendonitis. Theory also predicts that feet with a medially deviated STJ axis will be more likely to have posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. So, I want to see the study where people with medially deviated STJ axes are put in anti pronation shoes and those with a lateral STJ axis are not put in anti pronation shoes and then look at the incidence of selected specific injuries. Grouping all injuries might help with statistics, but theory would predict that specific injuries would be addressed with certain modifications.

    People reading the conclusion of that article should not think that all methods for selecting a specific shoe modification will not prevent injuries. As was correctly stated in the paper arch height vs shoes did not prevent injury. Other methods might.

    Eric
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    8
    A red flag has been raised re these studies by Paul Inghram that is worth reading to put the above studies into context.
     
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