Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

Prevalence of flat foot in preschool-aged children

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by NewsBot, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Prevalence of flat foot in preschool-aged children.
    Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):634-9
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. It's always interesting to me that the pediatricians' favorite line to concerned parents is "don't worry, flatfoot in children is normal" unless it is their own child, and then they make it a point to have their own child put into orthoses.

    How did they determine that 90% of treatments were unnecessary??
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    5
    Its actually quite bizarre - they collect and present some good data, then the last part of the discussion is below, that is not supported by the data - its just a rant:
    At least we know that this bit is not true:
    See this thread: Do foot orthoses weaken "arch" muscles?
     
  5. pediatric flat foot

    Very interesting data

    My caseload is around 85% pediatrics. I tend to err on the side of issueing orthotics if i am in any doubt as to whether they are needed or not. I am certain that many of these are issued to children who would indeed get better by themselves with no help at all. My thinking is that i rarely see an older child and wish they had NOT been given orthotics earlier. I frequently see teenagers with fixed forefoot inversion or some other secondary pathology and wish somebody had caught them before they reached that point!

    Is that wrong of me?


    Regards
    Robert Isaacs
     
  6. Robert:

    I don't see a problem with making custom or using prefabricated orthoses in children that have significant pathology or symptoms. Of course, there are some podiatrists that feel that treatment of asymptomatic flatfooted children with foot orthoses is "unethical". However, I don't agree and have no problem whatsoever with treating children with foot orthoses if they have significant flatfoot deformity or there is a family history of flatfoot and/or significant mechanical foot symptoms. I do have a problem with podiatrists that make custom foot orthoses for every child with a flatter than normal arch shape since I think this is wasteful and unneccessary.
     
  7. Pediatric flatfoot

    Kevin et al

    Thanks for that. I think a lot of the dispute and angst over whether or not to treat asymptomatic children boils down to the root of all evil, money. Even if the clinician acts with the very purest of motives and honestly beleives in treating a higher proportion of children, eyebrows are bound to raise if he / she is making a small fortune in the process. Motive and oppertunity alone are by no means proof of guilt however they do inevitably raise suspicions! We live in a sad and blighted world where it is hard to trust anyone who is selling anything!

    Witness to, the proliferation of commercial labs manufacturing "different", "breakthrough" or "new paradigm" varieties of orthotic. Most claim to be a breakthrough in the care of patients but i for one will admit to starting from a position of extreme suspicion if the breakthrough is going to make the clinician rich!

    Perhaps this is why we hold the academic side of the profession in such high regard?

    Regards
    Robert Isaacs
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    What is the best method for child longitudinal plantar arch assessment and when does arch maturation occur?
    Andrea Naomi Onodera, Isabel Camargo Neves Sacco, Eliana Harumi Morioka, Priscila Saraiva Souza, Márcia Regina de Sá and Alberto Carlos Amadio
    The Foot; Volume 18, Issue 3, September 2008, Pages 142-149
     
  9. Bug

    Bug Well-Known Member

    Why oh why do we see study upon study that does not take into consideration pain and the effect of the foot upon gross motor skills and general development. This study is a classic example.

    The child's ability to keep up and develop within the range of normal, based on their tone and foot position (amongst other things) is something that the physio's and OT's are good at considering. How much do we as podiatrists do this? Why aren't we utilizing developmental tools to aid our decision making process, it should be us doing these sort of studies with our allied health collegues that are skilled in the child as a whole rather than a foot at the end of the body.
     
  10. Colette Johnston

    Colette Johnston Welcome New Poster

    Interesting. Was the methodology vigorous, and were validity and reliability ensured?
     
  11. Maltapod

    Maltapod Welcome New Poster

    HI I am wondering for a tilte re my Masters project. I am a Maltese podiatrist and re foot health education in my country nothing has been done yet. I might go for the prevelance of lower limb conditions in maltese obese children aged 8 -12 years(high rate internationally). Can anyone givve me a hint or tools I can use? Your help is more than appreciated

    regards

    Maltapod
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Prevalence of flatfoot in school between 3 and 10 years. Study of two
    different populations geographically and socially

    Vergara-Amador Enrrique, Rafael Fernando Serrano Sáncheza, Juan Rafael Correa Posadaad, Adriana Carolina Molanoa, Oscar A. Guevaraa
    Colombia Médica - Vol. 43 Nº 2, 2012 (Abril-junio)

     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Change in flatfoot of preschool-aged children: a 1-year follow-up study
    Kun-Chung Chen, Li-Chen Tung, Chih-Jung Yeh, Jeng-Feng Yang, Jing-Fu Kuo, Chun-Hou Wang
    European Journal of Pediatrics; November 2012
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Prevalence of Flatfoot and Anthropometric Comparison Between Flat and Normal Feet in the Hausa Ethnic Group of Nigeria
    Musa B. T. Umar and Rabiu U. Tafida
    J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 103(5): 369–373, 2013
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Flatfoot Diagnosis by a Unique Bimodal Distribution of Footprint Index in Children.
    Chang C, Chen Y, Yang W, Ho P, Hwang A, Chen C, Chang J, Chang L.
    PLoS One. 2014 Dec 31;9(12):e115808.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Foot arch shape in children aged 2-5 years according to the data of plantography and holographic interferometry
    Morfologiia. 2014;146(4):64-9.
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Prevalence of Flexible Flatfoot Among School-Age Girls
    Kaynoosh Homayouni; Hajar Karimian; Mahshid Naseri; Narges Mohasel
    Shiraz E-Med J. 2015 February; 16(2): e18005.
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Flatfoot in School-Age Children
    Prevalence and Associated Factors

    Ebrahim Sadeghi-Demneh, PhD; Fahimehsadat Jafarian, MSc; Jonathan M. A. Melvin, PhD; Fatemeh Azadinia, MSc; Fatemeh Shamsi, MSc; Mohamad Jafarpishe, BSc
    Foot Ankle Spec March 29, 2015
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Structural asymmetry of foot arch formation in early school-age children
    Jacek Stodółka / Weronika Stodółka / Krzysztof Maćkała
    Biomedical Human Kinetics. Volume 7, Issue 1, ISSN (Online) 2080-2234, DOI: 10.1515/bhk-2015-0013, June 2015
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Children Flat Foot and Lower Limb
    Rotational Profile: A Cross-Sectional
    Descriptive Study

    Jemni Sonia et al
    Open Journal of Orthopedics, 2015, 5, 326-335
     
  21. Mands

    Mands Welcome New Poster

    My place of work conducts screening of children's feet at various local 4 year old kindergartens. In a 12 month period 275 children were screened for developmental lower limb and foot problems. Of these children, 29% had flat feet, 18% were intoeing, 6% were toe walking, 6% had syndactyly and 41% had no identified problems.
     
  22. Bug

    Bug Well-Known Member

    While impact factors are flawed......be wary of anything published in a journal with a report IF of:
    Google-based Impact Factor: 0.24

    Kind of tells you the standard of what will be published.
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Medial Longitudinal Arch Development of Children Aged 7 to 9 Years: A Longitudinal Investigation.
    Tong JW, Kong PW
    Phys Ther. 2016 Feb 18.
     
  24. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Ultrasonographic evaluation of Achilles tendon in children with flatfoot: A case-control morphometric study
    Y. Gonula, O. Yucelb, M. Erogluc, I. Senturkc, S. Eroglud, O. Dikicid, O. Cartillia, M. Ulaslid
    Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging; 17 March 2016
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Association between flatfoot and age is mediated by sex: A cross-sectional study
    Ukachukwu Okoroafor Abaraogu, , Chiamaka Onyeka, Chukwuebuka Ucheagwu, Maduabuchi Ozioko
    Polish Annals of Medicine; 4 May 2016http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1230801316300054
     
  26. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Medial Longitudinal Arch Development of Children Aged 7 to 9 Years: Longitudinal Investigation
    Jasper W.K. Tong, Pui W. Kong
    Physical Therapy; in press
     
Loading...

Share This Page