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Shoes raises for leg length differences following hip replacement

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, May 10, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Shoe Raises for Symptomatic Leg Length Discrepancy after Total Hip Replacement: Do Patients Find Them Useful?
    B Akinola, H W Jones, T Harrison, K Tucker
    The Internet Journal of Orthopedic Surgery; Volume 22; Number 1
     
  2. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    "Patient satisfaction with THR is lower when the shoe raise proved ineffective" Duuuh!

    People with a problem that's not resolved are less satisfied than people who's problem is resoved - wow that really needed some research to establish
     
  3. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Really what was the point of this research?

    Leaving aside the fact that it sems unlikely that there were only 75 peopleout of4270 that had an LLD after hip replacement but rather there were only 75 identified. And that the protocol for defining LLD is not shown or probably even known e.g. was it actual, functional, wa sit correctly identified or were some incorrectly identified or if some might have been given heel lifts for the right when the short leg was the left. Leaving aside all that:

    If one has a patient who after hip replacement has been identified as having an LLD then if you fit a heel lift and it works then good and if it doesnt then take it out, simple. Even if this research showed that no patient reported any benifit in having a heel lift to address LLD then it does not follow that no patient ever will or that the patient that is presented to the clinician at the time of intererst will not respond well. Its a clinical decision not a statistical one.

    Dave
     
  4. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Well-Known Member

    If one has a patient who after hip replacement has been identified as having an LLD then if you fit a heel lift and it works then good and if it doesnt then take it out, simple. Even if this research showed that no patient reported any benifit in having a heel lift to address LLD then it does not follow that no patient ever will or that the patient that is presented to the clinician at the time of intererst will not respond well. Its a clinical decision not a statistical one.

    Finally, a correct biomechanical answer, without peer reviewed study.
     
  5. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Well-Known Member

    David,

    Good thinking out of the box, don't get lost now.
     
  6. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear team

    I will offer a reason why some do not do well by altering a shoe.

    The late great Vladamir Janda told the workshop that thos who cannot be helped are those with the assymetrical face, bigger boob, hand and foot.

    The way to see assymetry of the face is to:
    1. place a dot between their eyes
    2. frenulum of the lip
    3. middle of the chin.
    They should be in a straight line
    if not they the assymetrical is present.

    Still great weather autumn weather= hard to take
    regards
    Paul Conneely
    www.musmed.com.au
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Changes in plantar pressure, contact area and contact time symmetry during the gait 4 weeks before and 12 and 24 weeks after unilateral total hip arthroplasty
    Marta Gimunová et al
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2021 Aug 30
     
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