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The latest on gout

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Admin2, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. NewsBot

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    Articles:
    1
    Lower vitamin D levels are associated with depression in patients with gout.
    Zhou Q et al
    Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2019 Jan 14;15:227-231.
     
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    Gout Activity Score has predictive validity and is sensitive to change: results from the Nottingham Gout Treatment Trial (Phase II).
    Chinchilla SP, Doherty M, Abhishek A
    Rheumatology (Oxford). 2019 Feb 4
     
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    PUBLIC RELEASE: 2-APR-2019
    Gout treatment may help prevent obesity-related type 2 diabetes, suggests small NIH study
    The drug colchicine, used to treat the arthritic condition gout, could potentially reduce complications accompanying metabolic syndrome, a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar and other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Their study appears in Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism.

    Previous studies have indicated that the system-wide inflammation that occurs in obesity plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. In the current study, researchers led by Jack A. Yanovski, M.D., Ph.D., of NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) randomly assigned 21 study participants to received colchicine twice a day for 3 months, while 19 participants received a placebo. Colchicine suppresses a multi-protein complex called NLRP3, which triggers the inflammation seen in obesity.

    Researchers looked at several measures that reflect how well insulin works in the body to clear sugar from the blood (insulin resistance). There was no difference between the two groups in insulin resistance determined by one measure of insulin use (the frequently sampled, insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test). However, the colchicine group showed improvement on the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance test, which also estimates how much insulin is needed to keep blood sugar at a normal level while fasting. Those in the colchicine group also scored lower on a blood test of C-reactive protein and other tests that indicate inflammation. The authors concluded that larger studies are needed to determine if colchicine could prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with metabolic syndrome.
     
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    Articles:
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    A systematic literature review of patient-reported outcome measures used in gout: an evaluation of their content and measurement properties.
    Janssen CA et al
    Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2019 Apr 11;17(1):63
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The Italian Society of Rheumatology clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gout.
    Ughi N et al
    Reumatismo. 2019 Sep 23;71(S1):50-79. doi: 10.4081/reumatismo.2019.1176.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Patient Perceptions of Gout Management Goals: A Cross-sectional Internet Survey
    Jasvinder A Singh, N Lawrence Edwards
    J Clin Rheumatol. 2020 Jun;26(4):129-133
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Association Between Gout and Injury Risk: A National Retrospective Cohort Study
    Shih-Hsiang Ou et al
    Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 May 23;17(10)
     
  8. NewsBot

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    The Incidence, Prevalence, and Burden of Gout in the Veterans Health Administration
    Lindsay N Helget et al
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2020 May 31
     
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    The Experience of a Gout Flare: A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies
    Sarah Stewart et al
    Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2020 Jun 9;50(4):805-811
     
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    The Development of a Targeted and More Potent, Anti-Inflammatory Derivative of Colchicine: Implications for Gout
    Guillaume Paré et al
    Biochem Pharmacol. 2020 Jun 26
     
  11. NewsBot

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    Articles:
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    Gout Epidemiology and Comorbidities
    Jasvinder A Singh, Angelo Gaffo
    Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2020 Jun;50(3S)
     
  12. NewsBot

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    Articles:
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    Gout: Where Is the Weak Link?
    Eliseo Pascual et al
    J Clin Rheumatol. 2020 Jul 6
     
  13. NewsBot

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    Articles:
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    Natural Products and Extracts as Xantine Oxidase Inhibitors - A Hope for Gout Disease?
    Ilkay Erdogan Orhan, Fatma Sezer Senol Deniz
    Curr Pharm Des. 2020 Jul 28
     
  14. NewsBot

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    Gout diagnoses rising worldwide
    Press Release:
    The prevalence of gout–a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints–increased across the world at an alarming rate from 1990 to 2017, according to an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.
    The analysis found that there were approximately 41.2 million prevalent cases of gout in 2017, with the rate of new diagnosed cases being 92 per 100,000 people, an increase of 5.5% from 1990.
    Gout was more common in males and in older individuals. Also, the burden of gout was generally highest in developed regions and countries. High body mass index and impaired kidney function were risk factors for gout.
    “The increasing trend of gout burden is most likely to continue as the global aging population is on the rise,” said senior author Emma Smith, PhD, of The University of Sydney, in Australia. “Attempts to lessen the disease onset and future burden of gout require better awareness, especially of risk factors, and early diagnosis and treatment.”
     
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    Allopurinol: Sorrow to the marrow
    U R Raaju et al
    J Family Med Prim Care. 2020 May 31;9(5):2511-2513
     
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    Articles:
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    Physical activity measured using wearable activity tracking devices associated with gout flares
    Nada Elmagboul et al
    Arthritis Res Ther. 2020 Aug 3;22(1):181
     
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    NEWS RELEASE 13-AUG-2020
    EULAR: Amputations of body parts: The combination of diabetes and gout significantly increases

    Diabetes mellitus and gout are ranked among the most common metabolic disorders in Western industrialised countries: According to figures published by the World Health Organization (WHO), around 60 million Europeans suffer from diabetes (2) and 18 million Europeans suffer from gout (3). "Gout is increasingly being linked to unfavourable cardiovascular, renal and metabolic complications, and now amputation risks", says EULAR president Professor Iain B. McInnes from Glasgow, Scotland, Great Britain. In a current study, Brian Lamoreaux, MD, MS from Lake Forest/USA showed how high the risk of amputations of outer limbs is by evaluating 190 million data sets from a patient database.

    The research team divided the patients into four groups according to their medical records: patients with gout; patients with diabetes; patient with both gout and diabetes; and patients with neither disease. Afterwards, they compared how many patients from each group required an amputation of the outer limbs. The amputation rate of patients suffering from neither of those diseases was 0.03 percent. By contrast, the amputation rate of patients with gout rose to 0.16 percent. For people suffering only from diabetes, the value trebled to 0.46 percent. "Patients suffering from either gout or diabetes have a significantly increased risk of an amputation. In patients with both diseases, this effect is further amplified", says Dr. LaMoreaux. According to the results of his study, the amputation rate among patients with both diabetes and gout is 0.77 percent, compared to 0.03 percent in the control group.

    Professor John Isaacs, Chair of the Scientific Programme Committee of EULAR, emphasises that these results are of highest relevance for daily clinical practice: "The more we know about the risks, complications and complications of diabetes and gout, the more specifically we can inform patients and optimize therapeutic strategies to possibly prevent serious surgeries such as amputations". According to the expert, the loss of a part of the body is particularly hard for many people, furthering the urgency to properly manage both conditions.
     
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