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Toronto Recognition for a UK Podiatrist

Discussion in 'Canada' started by UKA Pod, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. UKA Pod

    UKA Pod Active Member


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    Hi,

    Needing guidance!

    I am currently studying podiatry in the UK, and am keen to look into emigrating to Canada, particularly Toronto. I would be very grateful if anybody could tell me what the policy or procedure would be for a qualified podiatrist from the UK gaining recognition in Toronto?

    I have been doing a bit of research myself, and I have come across many "chiropodists" as they are called, who have studied Podiatry in the UK and then completed a chiropodist course from the "michener institute". I wanted to know if I would have to spend another 3 years in Canada completing the same course or would I be able to just pass a recognition exam to practise?

    Many thanks.
     
  2. MJJ

    MJJ Active Member

  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  4. SarahR

    SarahR Active Member

    I am in Ontario. As far as I know all established UK BSc Podiatry courses are recognized by the College of Chiropodists of Ontario. Some of my Ontario colleagues are sending their offspring to the UK to obtain training as our program now requires a degree for entry but does not graduate students with a masters; simply more years in school. So we end up with 3-4 years of lost income and extra years of tuition training domestically. You will have to submit your transcripts etc; and may have to send in course outlines if your program has not been evaluated in the past.

    You do have to take a licence examination when you get here. Look into dates carefully, low numbers coming so they only sit the exam once a year.

    Why Toronto may I ask? It is the most saturated market in all of Canada and we have few-almost no publicly funded positions. It is private practice or associateships which are few and far between when everyone is already drawing on the same pool for clients in smallish offices (no room for a second clinician) with high overhead costs.
     
  5. Caroline.w

    Caroline.w Welcome New Poster

    Hi

    I'm a uk trained podiatrist. I qualified from the University of Huddersfield in 2011. I came over after I finished and spent a few months getting my registration. I don't know whether I can message you privately because the explanation is to long to put on here. Anyway I am very lucky and I managed to get a job working for a publicly funded family health team and I love the job. It wasn't overly difficult to get licensed in Ontario but it does require you to save a fair bit of money to pay for applications, insurance and license.

    caroline
     
  6. UKA Pod

    UKA Pod Active Member

    Hi,

    I didn't realise that it was high competition in Ontario?

    I wanted to move to Ontario because I have family there and recently my best freind moved to Toronto over a year ago. There experience seems to say that their pay goes a lot further in Ontario when compared with the UK. I've also been on holiday in Canada and i've loved the lifestyle/housing/ people etc.

    What would the salery be like in Ontario, if I can ask?

    Many thanks for all your replys and guidence, it's really appreciated.

    Please feel free to message me privately.

    All the best!
     
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