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Weight gain can trigger foot and ankle pain

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by admin, Mar 14, 2005.

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  1. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member


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    Weight gain can trigger foot and ankle pain

    Increased stress on tendons can lead to reconstructive surgery if proper steps are not taken.

    By Susan J. Landers, AMNews staff. March 21, 2005.

    Full story from AMNews
     
  2. Atlas

    Atlas Well-Known Member

    I have a problem with the medical and paramedical profession jumping to 'weight' as the sole reason for (lower-limb) pain, particularly when symptoms are unilateral.

    I concede that weight may be a factor, but hidden, is another more important underlying factor why one limb is affected, whilst contra-laterally, no signs and symptoms are evident/experienced.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Press release

    Ress release from Reuters:
    Foot pain should not prevent obese from exercising
    January 25, 2006 07:19:10 AM PST
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The biomechanics of restricted movement in adult obesity.
    Obes Rev. 2006 Feb;7(1):13-24
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Musculoskeletal findings in obese subjects before and after weight loss following bariatric surgery.
    Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr 25;
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Reducing weight increases postural stability in obese and morbid obese men.
    Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 May 9;
     
  8. DAVOhorn

    DAVOhorn Well-Known Member

    Not rocket science

    Dear All ,

    this is not rocket science.

    The human skeleton is an amazing piece of engineering.

    It enables us to walk about in search of food refreshment and sex. This enables our species to endure.

    So if the skeleton has been designed to have specific load factors imposed upon it then it will function fine for a very long time. It will,amazingly repair some of the damage sustained over the years.

    So if you increase by 50% the load it has to drag around then it is not surprising that various structures are damaged either severley or by recurrent overload over the years leading massive accumulated damage.

    So the part of the skeleton that contacts the ground has the highest load factors both static and dynamic.

    This should mean in real life that the obese cant run fast enough to catch their food water and indeed catch a potential mate. So they would die out and their gene pool would diminish.

    trouble is in our civilised society someone else catches our food and water and mates sometimes find mutually obese mates so things continue.

    So Take a truck designed to carry 20tons and put on it 30 tons and watch what happens .

    Broken springs and shocks.

    Damaged tyres.

    Worn and damaged brakes.

    Damage to the chassis and bodywork.

    and a shorter working life.

    With a truck you buy a better chassis etc.

    With the human body you have to die and hopefully god will give you another shot at life with a new body. It may be as cockroach though. :eek:

    regards David
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Musculoskeletal disorders associated with obesity: a biomechanical perspective.
    Obes Rev. 2006 Aug;7(3):239-50
     
  10. martinharvey

    martinharvey Active Member

    At Last.

    Finally, I now have an answer to give all those Pts who say "Ugggh, I dont know WHY you want to have have anything to do with feet"

    - "madame, I am a no less than a guardian and facilitator of the species imperative for peripatetic GastroProcreation"

    Do you think I might get a research grant for this?

    :D Martin
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Computerized baropodometry in obese patients.
    Obes Surg. 2006 Dec;16(12):1574-8
    Fabris SM, Valezi AC, de Souza SA, Faintuch J, Cecconello I, Junior MP
     
  12. NewsBot

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    Effects of Obesity on the Biomechanics of Walking at Different SpeedsRaymond C. Browning; Rodger Kram
    Full text from Medscape (free registration required)
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The effects of obesity on orthopaedic foot and ankle pathology.
    Frey C, Zamora J.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2007 Sep;28(9):996-9.
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Three-dimensional gait analysis of obese adults
    Peggy P.K. Lai, Aaron K.L. Leung, Agnes N.M. Li, M. Zhang
    Clinical Biomechanics (in press)
     
  15. Jonatan García

    Jonatan García Active Member

    Irving DB, Cook JL, Young MA, Menz HB. Obesity and pronated foot type may increase the risk of chronic plantar heel pain: a matched casecontrol study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2007;8:41.

    Regards
     
  16. NewsBot

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    The Telegraph are reporting:
    Obesity crisis 'causing painful foot problems'
    The number of people needing treatment for serious foot problems has doubled in a decade because of Britain's obesity crisis experts have warned.
    Link to story
     
  17. Robyn Elwell-Sutton

    Robyn Elwell-Sutton Active Member


    I totally agree and the most common anomoly consistently overlooked is the limb length difference often created by a smaller (varus) heel bone measured from the inferior medial malleolus to the the weight bearing surface - in comparison to the opposite leg/foot (both feet in neutral ankle and patient supine after hip muscle mobilisation. The significant difference can be as little as 6-8mm in the recently overweight. There is often also contralateral sacroiliac/piriformis irritation.

    Robyn Hood:pigs:
     
  18. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    "I have a problem with the medical and paramedical profession jumping to 'weight' as the sole reason for (lower-limb) pain, particularly when symptoms are unilateral."

    I don't think anyone said that:confused: (apart from some sloppy newspaper article).

    Excess weight can certainly be a contributory factor in lower limb/foot pain, as it can in many other health issues.

    Here in the UK we have approximately 50% of women and 75% of men now either overweight or obese (extrapolated from DOH figures for England and Wales). It is a bigger problem than, say, a pair of mis-matched heel bones.

    Just out of interest, do you have a ref for your mismatched heel-bone theory?
     
  19. Robyn Elwell-Sutton

    Robyn Elwell-Sutton Active Member

    I am not negating the effects of excess weight - 5 kg sudden gain seems to trip a unilateral foot problem. I come back to the question - why one foot/hip only in pain?
    In nature perfect symmetry is not the norm for most body paired parts (the optometrist, shoe fitter, corsetier will attest). Most of my patients in this catagory present with one longer slimmer foot and one shorter wider foot. The smallness of the heel is in all dimensions ( 3 planes) and the foot is generally more mobile at STJ and particularly the MTJ, but with a lesser ROM at the hip than the contralateral hip.With feet , neonatal compression in utero ensures that one foot is inverted more than the other. (usually the left) . With assuming of weight bearing in the first two years, it is quite possible for the smaller heel to receive less force and remain less "developed" - basic laws of Wolfe about bone modelling responding to the amount and direction of force upon it. Re the varus angle contributing to the lesser force upon the smaller heel -
    An excellent account of neonatal and parediatric development is found in the physio "bible" :"Progressive casting and splinting for Lower Extremity Deformities in Children with Neuromotor Dysfunction" Beverley Cusick MS PT 1990 USA ISBN 0-88450-454-9 Cat No: 4182. She quotes (chap 2)Tachdjan (1985); Sgarlato (1971);Jordan et al( 1983) and Tax(1985); McCrae (1985). Chap 2, Page 32:
    "Hindfoot varus - the talocalcaneal angle is one of varus when the subtalar joint is aligned in congruity. Persistence of the calcaneal torsion seems to account for this varus disposition of the neutral hindfoot (and forefoot)."The author is the first to admit that further research is needed

    To my younger colleagues I offer this advice: Study the abnormal neuromotor patterns to learn what is "normal". Oldies often revert to compensatory mechanisms with age. Too much research is done on the other end of the spectrum of the young and fit . Like with astronomy and archeology , you have to examine the past (as evidenced in fully compensated pathology) to determine the present . Now in my 60s , I have had the priviledge of treating 3 generations of the same family , as did the greats of early work such as Herman Tax.(see Podopaediatrics 2nd Ed1980 ISBN -0-683-08118-7). The refernces are a life time of study.

    Babies have not changed much since then. It would be interesting to see if the increase in older, more overweight mothers produces a greater incidence of unilateral lower limb problems in the offspring????? And ....whether the smaller heel on one side correlates with sacroliliac /piriformis/ sciatic irritation on the contralateral side by way of compensation. Ask the therapeutic masseurs!or better still ..... get them to massage you and explain what they are looking at!

    Robyn Hood:pigs:
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2009
  20. Robyn Elwell-Sutton

    Robyn Elwell-Sutton Active Member

    Re: At Last.

    "He who walks with a limp - runs with a hop!" Who wants to procreate with someone who hops ? Natural selection.
    Robyn Hood:pigs:
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Influence of obesity and sarcopenic obesity on plantar pressure of postmenopausal women.
    Monteiro M, Gabriel R, Aranha J, Castro MN, Sousa M, Moreira M.
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2010 Feb 20. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  22. Robyn Elwell-Sutton

    Robyn Elwell-Sutton Active Member

    please excuse my ignorance, but I have not come across the term "sarcopenic" in this context. Could I have a definition please.
     
  23. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    'Sarcopenic obesity' is obesity and a reduction in muscle mass.... really bad form of obesity.
     
  24. NewsBot

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    From Healio:
    Higher lifetime weight trajectories associated with foot pain

     
  25. NewsBot

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    Increase in body weight over a two-year period is associated with an increase in midfoot pressure and foot pain
    Tom P. Walsh et al
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research201710:31
     
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