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Assessment of hypermobility

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by Bug, Oct 27, 2014.

  1. Bug

    Bug Well-Known Member


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    After spending time just reading some of the new studies coming out with unsurprising results, I continue to be surprised though when chatting with colleagues how few podiatrists actually use a formal scale or any tests for hypermobility especially when working with children.

    I commonly use the Beighton with every child and anyone score over a 5, I'll do the LLAS. Anyone use anything else or I'm interested to understand why they aren't being used?
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Tariff Hogan Jinn

    Tariff Hogan Jinn Welcome New Poster

    I prefer the Bulbena et al. 1992 (Hospital Del Mar) hypermobility measure for general/global over the Beighton and always perform Jill's LLAS as part of my standard assessment because I always check hips, knees, ankles, stj, mtj, ect. that are the components anyway.

    The reason its not utilized is our professions limited scope of reading as the majority do not have access to the relevant journals, Angela's recent papers in JAFAR looking at reliability have helped disseminate somewhat but we lack authoritive accessible discipline specific texts or even clinical pearls like physiopedia and orthobullets which I write for a fair bit.

    Any Q's fire away
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Outcome measures for assessing change over time in studies of symptomatic children with hypermobility: a systematic review
    Muhammad Maarj, Andrea Coda, Louise Tofts, Cylie Williams, Derek Santos & Verity Pacey
    BMC Pediatrics volume 21, Article number: 527 (2021)
     
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