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Autism, sensory processing disorder and footwear

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Maria Murray, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. Maria Murray

    Maria Murray Member


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    Hello, I am in need of assistance.
    Where in Sydney or thereabouts is there a footwear store which understands the complexities surrounding autism and sensory processing disorder?
    I need to be able to obtain suitable footwear for a patient who is applying for NDIS funding. I want to be able to take the patient to a store where she can try light weight, flexible, seamless, fully enclosed, almost slightly compressive, total contact, ankle style boots. She can tolerate ugg boots.
    She is currently not wearing any shoes, and consequently is at risk of injury, as her protective/deep sensation is poor, but her touch sensation is hyper-sensitive. So strappy sandals - any shoe where there is not constant contact will cause irritation to the point where she has to tear them off. She also has Raynauds which complicates things temperature wise - her hot/cold perception is interesting.
    Thanks for your thoughts,
    Maria Murray - Avoca Beach Podiatry
     
  2. Maria Murray

    Maria Murray Member

    The patient is 22 years old. Most of what I have read relates to kids, and more about their coping with the noise of shopping centres than about finding adequate footwear.
     
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