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Best Postoperative Care for Chemical Matricectomy

Discussion in 'Podiatry Arena Help, Suggestions and Comments' started by drdebrule, Sep 10, 2013.

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  1. drdebrule

    drdebrule Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Is there an optimum post-operative care protocol for chemical matricectomy to decrease healing/drainage time?

    I located two abstracts from JAMPA regarding use of collagen-alginate vs. soaks and silver sulfadiazine and hydrocortisone 1% cream cream. However, I am hoping Podiatry Arena members can assist me with locating other evidence based studies or guidelines. For such a common procedure, there seems to be little written about this.:confused:
     
  2. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member


    I do not know. I do know that I switched to simply excising the nail matrix, partial or whole and used a couple of sutures, I had no complications of prolonged healing or drainage, minimal post-op pain and very quick healing.

    If there was a severe paronychia present, I would avulse the nail and excise the hypertrophied tissue if present. I would wait until the infection was cleared and then would proceed with sharp excision of the nail matrix. Minimal pain during the course of treatment and quick healing with extremely low rate of recurrence.

    IMO, for those trained in surgery, sharp excision is the way to go. Post-op infection is rare and in-office procedure time is minimal. Thats the procedure I had done for myself as well. Now I gotta fix my Hallux limitus.

    Steven

    One pearl: When I used Phenol and I had prolonged healing/drainage, I would Rx 2% Nitroglycerin ointment and have the patient apply it with a cotten tip applicator to the base of their toe and tarsal tunnel area BID. Had great results with it. Great local vasodilator.
     
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