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Cutaneous reflexes contribute to stability during walking

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by markjohconley, Feb 18, 2006.

  1. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    only saw the abstract but looked interesting
    Brain Res. 2005 Nov 16;1062(1-2):48-62. Epub 2005 Oct 24.
    The authors maintained their study "(supported) the hypothesis that cutaneous reflexes from the foot contribute to the maintenance of stability during walking."
     
  2. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Plantar cutaneous input modulates differently spinal reflexes in subjects with intact and injured spinal cord.
    Spinal Cord. 2006 Mar 14;
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Immediate effects of plantar inputs on the upper half muscles and upright posture: a preliminary study.
    Cranio. 2006 Jan;24(1):50-9.
     
  5. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear All

    There was a study releasde from Europe three months or so ago (I'm Looking for the reference) that looked for any differences to the conduction time in the nreves of the lower limb comparing runners to the average 'Joe'.

    They found that the runners had delayed conduction time of 20msecs to the plantar nerves compared to the averag 'joe' who did not run.

    So who is right?

    Bet this mob were. I will post it when I find the paper. I know it was re-published in the Autralian Sports Medicine Journal of ?April 2006.

    Paul Conneely
    www.musmed.com.au
     
  6. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

  7. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear Admin

    Yes this is the paper.

    I found the whole article and the delay is 20 msecs. I presume this delay indicates that most important information comes from the joints not the skin as the late Janda used to advocate.

    Paul Conneely
    www.musmed.com.au
     
  8. NewsBot

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    Articles:
    1
    Location specificity of plantar cutaneous reflexes involving lower limb muscles in humans.
    Exp Brain Res. 2006 Jul 18;
     
  9. NewsBot

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    Articles:
    1
    Contact force- and amplitude-controllable vibrating probe for somatosensory mapping of plantar afferences with fMRI.
    J Magn Reson Imaging. 2006 Oct 9;
    Gallasch E, Golaszewski SM, Fend M, Siedentopf CM, Koppelstaetter F, Eisner W, Gerstenbrand F, Felber SR
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 2, 2007
  10. NewsBot

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    Articles:
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    Relative contribution of the pressure variations under the feet and body weight distribution over both legs in the control of upright stance.
    J Biomech. 2006 Dec 27;
    Rougier PR
     
  11. NewsBot

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    Articles:
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    Facilitation of the soleus stretch reflex induced by electrical excitation of plantar cutaneous afferents located around the heel.
    Neurosci Lett. 2007 Jan 21;
    Sayenko DG, Vette AH, Kamibayashi K, Nakajima T, Akai M, Nakazawa K
     
  12. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear All

    Nothing new. In Travell and Simon's book volume 2 the lower limb, shows the myotomal referral pattern from the soleus muscle to involve the area around the heel.

    Methinks the wheel has been reinvented.

    musmed

    www.musmed.com.au
     
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    Articles:
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    Evidence of Proactive Forefoot Control During Landings on Inclined Surfaces.
    J Mot Behav. 2007 Mar 1;39(2):89-102.
     
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    Articles:
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    Diminished plantar cutaneous sensation and postural control.
    McKeon PO, Hertel J.
    Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Feb;104(1):56-66.
     
  15. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear All

    I find this type of paper just a big I knew the answer.

    Two things give the outcome answers.

    Remember many people climb mount everest and other peaks....

    We only measure pressure and temperature, so in bipedal stance with freezing feet one would expect the foot to try and reduce the area in contact with the ground so as to preserve heat/energy loss, while in single stance there is no option but to place ones foot on the ground if you wish not to fall over.

    Basically a known outcome.

    They would be better off keeping their beer cool.........

    Paul Conneely
    www.musmed.com.au
    have a look to see how mobilisation changes feet/ankle angles and other unique bits
     
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    Articles:
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    Sensitivity of plantar cutaneous sensation and postural stability
    Ting-Yun Wanga, and Sang-I Lina
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2008 Jan 8 [Epub ahead of print]
     
  17. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear All

    Interesting but I do not hear of people who have severe diabetes of peripheral nerve neuropathy due to unknown causes ever complain about swaying gait nor does one see it.

    One outcome is acute, that is the experiment while the other is chronic and allows for time adaption.

    Cute but ? practical

    Musmed
     
  18. Paul:

    Individuals with peripheral neuropathy, where the sensory function of the feet are severely compromised, do show gait changes. They don't necessarily exhibit a "swaying gait. However, they will take smaller steps, use a wider base of gait and show more foot abduction during gait in order to give themselves more stability. These gait compensations allow the individual to put their center of mass further medial to the center of pressure of their stance phase foot than normal which will decrease their likelihood of falling laterally. This is a common gait finding in these individuals.
     
  19. Great chapter on peripheral neuropathies in: GAIT DISORDERS OF AGING. FALLS AND THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES. Edited by Joseph C. Masdeu, Lewis Sudarsky, and Leslie Wolfson. Philadelphia, Lippincott-Raven, 1997

    Among other things, they discuss why these patients are more likely to fall backwards!
     
  20. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear Kevin

    I agree that people do have a wider gait etc. but never have I had a swaying patient present to me with the statement, "look at my gait, what is wrong with me" outside of cerebral ischaemia/stroke etc.

    Interesting that Chronic (years and years) long distance runners who have a 50 millisecond delay in plantar nerve transmission do not exhibit this gait.

    I presume there aer many other factors involved that we do not understand just yet.....

    Regards

    Musmed
     

  21. Paul:

    The reason that people with peripheral neuropathy don't "sway" is likely because they have learned to walk with shorter strides, with a wider base of gait and with an abducted gait. In addition, the sensory signals for balance that the central nervous system (CNS) processes are not just limited to the cutaneous receptors of the plantar feet. The signals for balance come from the inner ear, eyes, joint and tendon receptors and, if I remember correctly, are also processed through the cerebellum. As a result, even in those individuals with no cutaneous receptors in their feet, such as in bilateral amputees, there is enough sensory input to the CNS from the other afferents that affect balance that these individuals can easily walk without a "sway" (and even walk with a push from the prostheses during the terminal stance phase of gait!).
     
  22. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Kevin

    Exactly, but if you reread the study abnormal gait is the be all and end all. That is why I think the study has no practical benefit.Amen

    Paul C
     
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