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Diagnosis and management of varicose veins in the legs

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Diagnosis and management of varicose veins in the legs: summary of NICE guidance
    BMJ 2013; 347 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f4279 (Published 24 July 2013)
     
  2. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    SEE FOLLOWING POST
     
  3. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    Surely this is one of these situations where a stitch in time saves nine. Varicose eczema or varicose ulcers are never the first manifestation.

    The earlier management is started the better. Varicose veins should be treated as soon as they show. Varicose veins never get better, they are never really stable and they only get worse.

    As a general rule getting in there and sclerosing the vein as soon as it shows means that you don't have to worry about future varicose eczema or ulceration.

    When a GP sees a patient, for whatever reason, who has early varicose veins, do they suggest treatment?

    Why are varicose veins and their sequelae left so long before they are treated?

    Bill
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Compression Therapy Versus Surgery in the Treatment of Patients with Varicose Veins: A RCT
    H. Sella et al
    European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery; Available online 24 March 2014
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The influence of the training of the muscular component of the musculo-venous pump in the lower extremities on the clinical course of varicose vein disease
    Kravtsov PF et al
    Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2016;93(6):33-36.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Evidence for varicose vein treatment: an overview of systematic reviews
    Ricardo de Ávila Oliveira et al
    Sao Paulo Med. J., ahead of print Epub July 16, 2018
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Treatment of varicose veins of lower
    extremity: a literature review

    Xueke Guo et al
    Int J Clin Exp Med 2019;12(3):2142-2150 (full text)
     
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