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Effect of music on running performance

Discussion in 'Break Room' started by NewsBot, Sep 27, 2016.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Ergogenic Effect of Music during Running Performance.
    Van Dyck E, Leman M
    Ann Sports Med Res 3(6): 1082. (2016)
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    7
  3. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    I was interested in this type of topic about 10 years ago after hearing a lecture on music whereby the speaker stated that there can be a detrimental effect of music on the heart during exercise... as the result of the syncopated beats of most pop/rock songs... this syncopated beat apparently would adversely affect the rhythmic beat of the heart whilst under the greater stress of exercise - hence excess stress (was one of the claims). It's been quite a while since I last looked into this topic but at the time I couldn't find any real material (research) to back up such claims.

    One of the reasons I became interested was due to having at least 3 bouts of Atrial Fibrillation whilst training... mind you, I wasn't listening to pop/rock music at the time these bouts occurred, just training hard (whilst dehydrated... hence my reasoning was an electrolyte imbalance).

    These days I listen to pop/rock music more often whilst training... particularly long runs by myself. I thought, stuff it... & adopted the philosophy - what doesn't kill me, makes me stronger :rolleyes: (& have been OK of late; albeit, I am better with my fluid intake).

    The issue I see with the previously cited music research (on performance) is that music is very subjective... the type of music that appeals to one, may not appeal to another... & what may be deemed motivational to one, may not be motivational for another. For example, most of the music I listen to is from the 80's (1980 - 1987)... today's music (generally) just doesn't cut it (in sound, lyrics & musical talent)... hence if the researchers gave me a playlist of today's music of what they deemed i.e. "slow motivational" & "fast motivational" I probably wouldn't relate to it all that much (hence likely wouldn't have much of an effect on my "prefrontal cortex area").

    But on the other hand...
     
  4. Hi Matt - I think it depends whether the rhythm of the music and our own internal rhythm we create when exercising are synchronised. Some people seem to have an inherent rhythm and are beautiful to watch - whether it be sports, dancing, whatever..others are not so fortunate. I can't remember the last time I didn't have a tune in my head
     
  5. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    Hi Mark. That's one way of looking at it. However, I was thinking more from a physiological/cardiac perspective (i.e. the normal beat rhythm of the heart compared to that of the syncopated beat rhythm of pop/rock music... in relation to exercise). As said previously, I was looking into this topic about 9 - 10 years ago... I have just gone through some old notes & have found the following I wrote on a running forum about 8 - 9 years ago...

    That last sentence tells the age of the above o_O i.e. the "development of the MP3" reference. I haven't really looked into this topic since then.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Listening to music during sprint interval exercise: The impact on exercise attitudes and intentions
    Matthew J. Stork & Kathleen A. Martin Ginis
    Journal of Sports Sciences 15 Oct 2016
     
  7. raun

    raun Active Member

    It depends upon the type of music and personal preferences....
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effect of (a)synchronous
    music on runners’ lower leg
    impact loading

    Valerio Lorenzon et al
    Musicae Scientiae 00(0)
     
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