Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Effect of music on running performance

Discussion in 'Break Room' started by NewsBot, Sep 27, 2016.

Tags:
  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Ergogenic Effect of Music during Running Performance.
    Van Dyck E, Leman M
    Ann Sports Med Res 3(6): 1082. (2016)
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    8
  3. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    I was interested in this type of topic about 10 years ago after hearing a lecture on music whereby the speaker stated that there can be a detrimental effect of music on the heart during exercise... as the result of the syncopated beats of most pop/rock songs... this syncopated beat apparently would adversely affect the rhythmic beat of the heart whilst under the greater stress of exercise - hence excess stress (was one of the claims). It's been quite a while since I last looked into this topic but at the time I couldn't find any real material (research) to back up such claims.

    One of the reasons I became interested was due to having at least 3 bouts of Atrial Fibrillation whilst training... mind you, I wasn't listening to pop/rock music at the time these bouts occurred, just training hard (whilst dehydrated... hence my reasoning was an electrolyte imbalance).

    These days I listen to pop/rock music more often whilst training... particularly long runs by myself. I thought, stuff it... & adopted the philosophy - what doesn't kill me, makes me stronger :rolleyes: (& have been OK of late; albeit, I am better with my fluid intake).

    The issue I see with the previously cited music research (on performance) is that music is very subjective... the type of music that appeals to one, may not appeal to another... & what may be deemed motivational to one, may not be motivational for another. For example, most of the music I listen to is from the 80's (1980 - 1987)... today's music (generally) just doesn't cut it (in sound, lyrics & musical talent)... hence if the researchers gave me a playlist of today's music of what they deemed i.e. "slow motivational" & "fast motivational" I probably wouldn't relate to it all that much (hence likely wouldn't have much of an effect on my "prefrontal cortex area").

    But on the other hand...
     
  4. Hi Matt - I think it depends whether the rhythm of the music and our own internal rhythm we create when exercising are synchronised. Some people seem to have an inherent rhythm and are beautiful to watch - whether it be sports, dancing, whatever..others are not so fortunate. I can't remember the last time I didn't have a tune in my head
     
  5. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    Hi Mark. That's one way of looking at it. However, I was thinking more from a physiological/cardiac perspective (i.e. the normal beat rhythm of the heart compared to that of the syncopated beat rhythm of pop/rock music... in relation to exercise). As said previously, I was looking into this topic about 9 - 10 years ago... I have just gone through some old notes & have found the following I wrote on a running forum about 8 - 9 years ago...

    That last sentence tells the age of the above o_O i.e. the "development of the MP3" reference. I haven't really looked into this topic since then.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Listening to music during sprint interval exercise: The impact on exercise attitudes and intentions
    Matthew J. Stork & Kathleen A. Martin Ginis
    Journal of Sports Sciences 15 Oct 2016
     
  7. raun

    raun Active Member

    It depends upon the type of music and personal preferences....
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effect of (a)synchronous
    music on runners’ lower leg
    impact loading

    Valerio Lorenzon et al
    Musicae Scientiae 00(0)
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Listening to music while running alters ground reaction forces: a study of acute exposure to varying speed and loudness levels in young women and men.
    Manca A et al
    Eur J Appl Physiol. 2020 Apr 10
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Listening to Preferred Music Improved Running Performance without Changing the Pacing Pattern during a 6 Minute Run Test with Young Male Adults
    Nidhal Jebabli eta l
    Sports 2020, 8(5), 61; 11 May 2020
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Use of Music to Improve Running Performance
    Jeremy Buttice
    Thesis; University of South Florida
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A multiple mediation analysis of the association between asynchronous use of music and running performance
    Masato Kawabata & Khai Leng Chua
    Journal of Sports Sciences : 18 Aug 2020
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Biophysiologically synchronous computer generated music
    improves performance and reduces perceived effort in trail
    runners

    Duncan Williams et al
    Source
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Instructed versus spontaneous entrainment of running cadence to music tempo
    Edith Van Dyck et al
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    NEWS RELEASE 22-JUN-2021
    Running to music combats mental fatigue a study suggests
    Listening to music while running might be the key to improving people's performance when they feel mentally fatigued a study suggests



    Listening to music while running might be the key to improving people's performance when they feel mentally fatigued a study suggests.

    The performance of runners who listened to a self-selected playlist after completing a demanding thinking task was at the same level as when they were not mentally fatigued, the research found.

    The study is the first to investigate the effect of listening to music playlists on endurance running capacity and performance when mentally fatigued.

    Researchers at the University of Edinburgh used two tests to study how listening to music affected the running performance of eighteen fitness enthusiasts.

    One test looked at the effects on interval running capacity - alternating between high intensity running and lower intensity jogging - with a group of nine physically active exercisers, and the other on a 5km time-trial with a group of nine trained runners.

    The groups completed a 30 minute computer based cognitive test which put them in a mentally fatigued state before completing high intensity exercise. The runners were tested with and without self-selected motivational music.

    Researchers assisted participants in choosing motivational songs with a pre-test questionnaire asking them to rate the rhythm, style, melody, tempo, sound and beat of the music.

    Examples of songs participants listened to were: Everyday by A$ap Rocky; Addicted To You by Avicii; Run This Town by Jay-Z; Power by Kanye West; No One Knows by Queens of the Stone Age; and Eye of the Tiger by Survivor.

    During the exercise, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at multiple points.

    The team took into account the results of a baseline test taken by participants which was without a mentally demanding test beforehand - and without the use of music.

    The researchers found the interval running capacity among the mentally fatigued fitness enthusiasts was moderately greater with music compared to without music, and was the same as when the participants were not mentally fatigued.

    The 5km time-trial performances also showed small improvements with self-selected music versus no music.

    Researchers say the positive effects of music could potentially be due to altered perception of effort when listening to tunes.

    Dr Shaun Phillips, of the University of Edinburgh's Moray House School of Education and Sport, said: "Mental fatigue is a common occurrence for many of us, and can negatively impact many of our day-to-day activities, including exercise. Finding safe and effective ways to reduce this negative impact is therefore useful.

    "The findings indicate that listening to self-selected motivational music may be a useful strategy to help active people improve their endurance running capacity and performance when mentally fatigued. This positive impact of self-selected music could help people to better maintain the quality and beneficial impact of their exercise sessions."

    Researchers say there are opportunities for further study into how listening to music while running affects larger and different groups of people, in different settings, and using different exercise challenges. Work in these areas is ongoing at the University of Edinburgh.
     
Loading...

Share This Page