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Effectiveness of foot orthoses for the prevention of injury

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Effectiveness of foot orthoses and shock-absorbing insoles for the prevention of injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Daniel R Bonanno, Karl B Landorf, Shannon E Munteanu, George S Murley, Hylton B Menz
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096671
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Interesting conclusion that overall Orthoses prevent injuries but not Soft tissue injuries
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP


    Conclusions Foot orthoses were found to be effective for preventing overall injuries and stress fractures but not soft-tissue injuries,

    That is pretty amazing that a generic orthosis can prevent a generic injury. An ideal model for orthosis prescription would be to identify anatomical structures that are more likely to be injured for a specific foot and then design an orthosis to prevent a specific injury. For example, the soft tissue injury of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction just might be related to having a medially deviated STJ axis. And if you gave feet with a medially deviated STJ axis an varus heel wedge (medial heel skive) orthosis before the presence of PT dysfunction, you might find that orthoses could be effective in preventing a specific soft tissue injury. But the studies that were used to make the above conclusion probably did not get that specific. With the right study, that conclusion might be reversed.

    Eric
     
  5. Agreed, once again we have "the cart being put before the horse". Without strong predictive models for the pathology...
     
  6. William Fowler

    William Fowler Active Member

    Agreed as well. A foot orthotics aimed at plantar fasciitis might be helpful to prevent plantar fasciitis, but not other injuries. Maybe.
     
  7. Pod on sea

    Pod on sea Active Member

    Anyone seen the full text? Do they state which 'non soft tissue injuries', other than stress fractures, DO seem to be prevented? I.e. which other injuries did they consider in the research? Thanks
     
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