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Effects of fatigue on running form

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Press Release:
    Tired runners can unknowingly change running form
    The effects of running in an exerted state on lower extremity kinematics and joint timing
    Tracy A. Dierks, Irene S. Davis, Joseph Hamill
    Journal of Biomechanics Volume 43, Issue 15 , Pages 2993-2998, 16 November 2010
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. After reading this paper, I have no idea how this phrase "complete breakdown of mechanics" applies to the slight alterations in rearfoot motion seen in this study. It certainly doesn't seem like a phrase I would have allowed as a reviewer in this paper to describe the changes in rearfoot kinematics seen in this group of runners. What exactly does a "complete breakdown of mechanics" mean in the Journal of Biomechanics? Sounds rather dramatic and un-scientific for a scientific journal of this caliber.
     
  4. Reading the above, I think the "complete breakdown in biomechanics" bit came from the press release (like the media would exaggerate the findings of a scientific study :bang:). I haven't read the paper, so I can't say if this statement is repeated therein.
     
  5. I wish that were the case, Simon. Here is the first two sentences from the conclusion of the paper:

    By the way, the only rearfoot kinematic variable measured was rearfoot eversion!:bang:

    Paper is on its way.:drinks
     
  6. Thanks Kevin. In which case that's an outrageous over-statement. Indeed, they say themselves: "Based on these results, runners demonstrated subtle changes in kinematics in the exerted state, most notably for eversion."
    So "subtle changes in kinematics" = complete breakdown in biomechanics. :morning: Nice work. :wacko:
     
  7. Here's the curve that demonstrates the "complete breakdown in mechanics" in the rearfoot....a whopping 1.5 degree change in peak rearfoot eversion angle!!:bang::craig:

    The bolded line represents the end of the run, in the "fatigued" state.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Like, wow. Goes to show the difference between statistical significance and clinical significance... Yet that 1.5 degrees may make all the difference. Devil's advocate says: " you can make people better without changing that angle at all, so why shouldn't 1.5 degrees be important?" Spooner says: it might be, but I don't think it represents "a complete breakdown in biomechanics", I've been wrong before.
     
  9. Instead of saying:

    I believe that a more objective way of wording the press release would be as follows:

    "The study showed that rearfoot mechanics changed slightly with fatigue, with rearfoot motion changing 1.5 degrees, which when considering the known skin to bone artifact seen with kinematics studies that use skin mounted markers may be an insignificant change. However, the 1.5 degree change in peak rearfoot eversion seen with fatigue may represent some change in skeletal motion of the rearfoot with fatigue, but certainly should not be considered to be a complete breakdown in rearfoot biomechanics.

    In addition, the slight extra rearfoot motion seen with fatigue is most likely the result of the muscles, tendons and ligaments exerting less internal supination moment as the run progressed into fatigue. The extra motion may or may not make it harder for the muscles, tendons or ligaments to handle the strain forces related to running."
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    High-Intensity Running and Plantar-Flexor Fatigability and Plantar-Pressure Distribution in Adolescent Runners.
    Fourchet F, Kelly L, Horobeanu C, Loepelt H, Taiar R, Millet G.
    J Athl Train. 2014 Dec 22.
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of fatigue on kinematics and kinetics during overground running: A systematic review.
    Winter S, Gordon S, Watt K.
    J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2016 Apr 13
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Adaptation of lower limb movement patterns when maintaining performance in the presence of muscle fatigue
    Kurt L. Mudie, , Amitabh Gupta, Simon Green, Peter J. Clothier
    Human Movement Science Volume 48, August 2016, Pages 28?36
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of running-induced fatigue on plantar pressure distribution in novice runners with different foot types
    Mehrdad Anbarian, Hamed Esmaili
    Gait and Posture; Article in Press
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Foot Joint Coupling Variability in Rearfoot and Forefoot Runners After an Exhaustive Run
    Rhiannon M. Seneli et al
    Presented at the ACSM Annual Meeting; Boston 2016
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Influence of a Bout of Exertion on Novice Barefoot Running Dynamics.
    Hashish R et al
    J Sports Sci Med. 2016 May 23;15(2):327-334
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of the foot strike pattern on muscle activity and neuromuscular fatigue in downhill trail running
    M. Giandolini et al
    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports; Early View
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Asymmetry between lower limbs during rested and fatigued state running gait in healthy individuals
    Kara N. Radzak
    Gait and Posture; Article in Press
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Differences in Pes Planus and Pes Cavus subtalar eversion/inversion before and after prolonged running, using a two-dimensional digital analysis
    Charlotte Sinclair et al
    Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation 2017; 13(2): 232-239.
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of fatigue and gender on kinematics and ground reaction forces variables in recreational runners.
    Bazuelo-Ruiz B et al
    PeerJ. 2018 Mar 20;6:e4489.
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Effects of fatigue on ankle biomechanics during jumps: A systematic review.
    Jayalath JLR et al
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2018 Jun 21;42:81-91.
     
  22. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Positive Work Contribution Shifts from Distal to Proximal Joints during a Prolonged Run
    Sanno, Maximilian; Willwacher, Steffen; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: August 30, 2018 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Reproducibility of the Evolution of Stride Biomechanics During Exhaustive Runs.
    Martens G et al
    J Hum Kinet. 2018 Oct 15;64:57-69.
     
  24. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The influence of prolonged running and footwear on lower extremity biomechanics
    Gillian Weir et al
    Footwear Science: 20 Nov 2018
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Modifications in running kinematics in fatigued running, do not influence the oxygen cost
    of transport

    Saint A. Sackey et al
    International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology: March 2019
     
  26. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Heat stress impairs proprioception but not running mechanics.
    Maybe K et al
    J Sci Med Sport. 2019 Jul 24.
     
  27. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    THE EFFECTS OF PROLONGED
    RUNNING ON THE BIOMECHANICS
    AND FUNCTION OF THE FOOT AND
    ANKLE

    Cowley, Emma
    PhD Thesis; University of Plymouth; 2019
     
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