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Effects of low dye tape

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, May 9, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    The effect of low-Dye taping on kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic variables: a systematic review.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;36(4):232-41
    Authors: Radford JA, Burns J, Buchbinder R, Landorf KB, Cook C
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Last edited by a moderator: May 9, 2006
  3. Navicular height, rearfoot dorsiflexion moments and forefoot plantarflexion moments

    Reading these reports on low dye taping and seeing that it obviously has an effect on navicular height, it seems that an increase in navicular height also indicates an increase in medial longitudinal arch height from the low dye taping. This increase in navicular height means that the low dye strapping has increased the external rearfoot dorsiflexion moments and has increased the external forefoot plantarflexion moments. The next logical step is to also assume that the low dye taping has also increased the dorsiflexion stiffness of the medial metatarsal rays. Because of these factors, there doesn't necessarily need to be much increase in navicular height for a significant change in tensile force within the plantar aponeurosis or plantar ligaments to occur with the application of a low-dye strap. Remember, it's not the position of the foot that causes injuries or allows injuries to be treated successfully. It is, rather, the forces and moments acting within the foot that will determine whether an injury occurs or an injury resolves with treatment.
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    ditto ... I mentioned in a previous thread that we showed that low dye strapping reduces the force to establish the windlass in the very very very short term.

    The paradox I see is that the changes that we found and others also report is that these changes in windlass force and the structural alignment changes are very short term (in our case, it only lasted for minutes; in other studies its up to 20 minutes), yet what you and I see clinically is that patients do respond over a longer period .... will wait for Joel's next installment I know is coming.
     
  5. Let me propose possible mechanical actions of a plantar arch strapping such as a low dye strapping:

    1. Applies anteriorly directed tensile force on skin of rearfoot.

    2. Applies posteriorly directed tensile force on skin of forefoot.

    3. Causes an external rearfoot dorsiflexion moment due to #1.

    4. Causes an external forefoot plantarflexion moment due to #2.

    5. Decreases internal tensile force in plantar aponeurosis due to #3 and #4.

    6. Increases dorsiflexion stiffness of medial column more than lateral column due to tape having a longer moment arm to increase forefoot plantarflexion moment on the higher arched medial column versus the lateral column.

    7. Increases subtalar joint supination moment due to shift of GRF to medial forefoot and/or more lateral location of subtalar joint axis (due to #6).

    8. Decreases force necessary to dorsiflex hallux in Hubscher maneuver due to #5 and plantar aponeurosis causing less resting hallux plantarflexion moment at 1st MPJ.

    As I have stated in a very early posting, but I can't remember when or where, you would get a much better and longer lasting improvements in the Hubscher maneuver if you drilled Steinman pins into both the medial aspect of the plantar calcaneus and into the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsal head and attached and tensioned a small steel cable between the calcaneal and 1st metatarsal pins. The steel cable would not cause a hallux plantarflexion moment when it was causing a forefoot plantarflexion moment, contrary to the function of the plantar aponeurosis that does cause a hallux plantarflexion moment at the same time it causes a forefoot plantarflexion moment.

    Playing around with these alternative human foot designs allows the clinician to better appreciate the amazingly elegant design of the human foot.
     
  6. Phil Wells

    Phil Wells Active Member

    Thinking around the subject of the effect of taping, could the effect of tape on the tensile forces acting aross the joints of the midfoot result in the mechanoreceptors of the joint capsules sending out different info back to the brain.

    The forces acting at these capsules could be significantly changed and consequently result in the brain treating the postural control of the medial arch, via tone in the post tib, tib ant etc, differently. This may explain the different findings as to the longevity of the taping effect.

    Phil
     
  7. 9. Compression of the tissues beneath the area of application. I have taken to having patients apply low-dye over-night and they have found it to have excellent beneficial effects in reducing their "first step pain".
     
  8. Simon:

    Please explain that one for me. I don't understand how compression of tissues with strapping over night would help post-static dyskinesia (i.e. first step pain).
     
  9. I think it helps limit the build up of inflammatory exudate.
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Anti-pronation tape changes foot posture but not plantar ground contact during gait
    The Foot Volume 16, Issue 2 , June 2006, Pages 91-97
     
  11. "Results
    Compared to the no-tape control condition, the MLA increased significantly after the application of tape (p = 0.000). Contact area was reduced in the medial and lateral rearfoot during jogging (p = 0.001 and 0.005, respectively) and the medial rearfoot during walking (p = 0.004) following tape. There was no significant mean difference between the taped and control conditions for mean Lateral-Medial Area Indices.

    Conclusion
    Whilst the ALD tape changed foot posture by providing an anti-pronation effect, minimal changes were noted in CA or LMAI after tape application. These findings indicate that anti-pronation tape procedures, like the ALD, do not significantly alter plantar contact area. "

    So tell me now, if the MLA increased significantly and if the contact area was reduced in the medial and lateral rearfoot during jogging (p = 0.001 and 0.005, respectively), then why was the conclusion given that there were minimal changes notes in contact area after taping? :confused:

    I am missing something here??
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Plantar foot pressures after the augmented low dye taping technique.
    Vicenzino B, McPoil T, Buckland S.
    J Athl Train. 2007 Jul-Sep;42(3):374-80.
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Tape That Increases Medial Longitudinal Arch Height Also Reduces Leg Muscle Activity: A Preliminary Study.
    Franettovich M, Chapman A, Vicenzino B.
    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Feb 29 [Epub ahead of print]
     
  14. Trent Baker

    Trent Baker Active Member

    I've never understood why podiatrists pursue low dye taping as a treatment option for patients who require mechanical assistance. If we know a patient requires a postural change within the foot and we know that change must be long term, then why not back yourself and use orthoses?

    I understand the use of taping in the case of acute injury, where a structure requires temporary unloading. I use it often in these circumstances. However the above study seems to have been focused on "a number of foot disorders" related to "foot pronation". Why then, if we know these disorders are related to foot pronation would we use low dye taping, a short term treatment, when we know what can be achieved with a longer term treatment such as orthotic therapy?

    Would we really Low Dye strap a foot, tell the patient to keep it relatively dry and advise them to re-tape every three days for the rest of their lives?
     
  15. Atlas

    Atlas Well-Known Member

    Actually it can last for a bit longer than 3 days. Your understanding of acute needs are A1.

    The problem now is that we have a cynical clientelle base with information overload. With the internet now, they can easily find/discover/read literature that places huge doubt on orthoses cost-effectiveness etc....etc... The patient today cannot split advice from a masseur with a weekend degree; a podiatrist with a bonefide masters association (not a mickey mouse undergraduate masters >2009); an academic who does not practice; or a physiotherapist who only deals in core-stability, reiki and electrotherapy.

    Circa 2008, much of a consultation is all about :
    **the patient telling you what they want you to hear that is actually irrelevant in the pursuit of accurate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention.... Wonderful tangential information. Beware the open question...
    **the therapist deconstructing the bulltish...and when you have finally done it, you have 8 minutes left in the consult.


    Low dye taping can really prove a point cheaply IMO.

    I don't know about that Kevin...depends on how one tapes low-dye. Other points make complete sense though. The tension reduction in the PF is knockout effect. And I think this tension reduction is the key to Simon's finding of reduced pain 1st steps. If the tape is compressing in NWB, you would think that neurovascular compromise could occur.

    Although the theory of changing a pulling point (tennis elbow strap) could theoretically occur with PF enthesopathy, and may be another reason (other than increasing arch and reducing tension etc. etc.) that a orthotic might help PFs. So his compressive theory might be technically correct, but neurovascularly threatening.
     
  16. Trent Baker

    Trent Baker Active Member

    Fair call Atlas. I can see your angle in terms of proving the point, it is indeed a handy tool in achieving that. However, I have to say that if a patient isn't willing to take my advice, I'm not prepaired to 'play the game'. I kind of pride myself of giving thorough explinations and hopefully pursuing informed therapy for each patient. In short, if they don't want to accept my treatment plan, which will always be the most appropriate and optimal for each patient (in my opinion), then they are free to grab a 2nd opinion elsewhere.

    I'm not a hard nose, perhaps this does sound a bit arrogant (I hope I'm not) but it is frustrating to think that I should compromise my belief's about a treatment plan for a patient, in an attempt to convince them into what's best for their problem. Which is what they came to me for in the first place. I find that a bit disconcerting. Don't you?
     
  17. DSP

    DSP Active Member

    Hi Trent,

    I recall reading a post by Kevin Kirby (I think it may have been to do with a plantar fasciitis discussion), where he mentioned that just because some pts respond well to Low-Dye strapping, does not indicate that they are always sutiable for orthosis. I've been meaning all along to ask Kevin what he meant by that becuase I have always anticipated that if a pt repsonds well to strapping, then they should repsond well to orthosis, however, this is apparently not the case.

    Therefore, low-dye strapping might be more important than we think it is in terms of our treatment plan. Perhaps if Kevin is reading along, he can chime in here, beacuse I may have misunderstood his post at the time, but I am pretty certain he wrote something along those lines.

    Regards,

    Daniel
     
  18. Trent Baker

    Trent Baker Active Member

    I hadn't seen that post Daniel. I'd be very interested to see what Kevin meant by that. If that is the case, then some of my passion will have to be extinguished, lol.

    T
     
  19. DSP

    DSP Active Member

    Hi Trent,

    I found the post:

    The trouble is, how do we determine which of the 2 is going to be better?
     
  20. Trent Baker

    Trent Baker Active Member

    I'm not sure, this looks much the same as what the guys were talking about earlier in this thread. I'm having another read over it now. I guess the crux of it is that orthoses will mechanically manipulate the foot using pressure. Taping will mechanically manipulate the foot by increasing or improving the tensile forces of soft tissues, such as enhancing the affect of the plantarfascia and plantar aponeurosis.

    Intersting way of thinking about it. However it still doesn't solve the problem of taping being only good for a few days, then re-application is required. This could be usefull in sports such as gymnastics though, where footwear is not used while active.
     
  21. Since low dye strapping can't itself push up on the longitudinal arch of the foot as an orthosis can, it works by helping prevent elongation of the longitudinal arch by using tensile forces from the tape acting on the skin. On the other hand, foot orthoses can't grab the skin and pull like tape can. Foot orthoses can, however, exert compression forces on the longitudinal arch of the foot to help prevent the arch from flattening further.

    Therefore, these two therapies, tensile forces for strapping and compression forces for foot orthoses, do not work mechanically the same way. As such, why would one then assume that if one works well, the other one would also work well, when they are not exact duplicates of each other? Each therapeutic method has its pros and cons and one is not necessarily better than the other for each patient. The clinician must learn to use the best therapy for each individual clinical situation in order to become the best healer for their patients.
     
  22. DSP

    DSP Active Member

    Kevin:

    Thank you for your explanation.

    How does one distinguish which of the two therapies is going to be more effective? If a pt is responding well to strapping but is finding it inconvenient, I would usually opt for an orthotic as part of my treatment plan. I would anticipate that time and experience are probably the biggest assets when making these decisions, however, I am still a relatively young clinician. Therefore, what are some of the things I should be attempting to identify when trying to determine which of the two therapies is going to be more appropriate?

    Regards,

    Daniel
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2008
  23. Daniel:

    I only occasionally use strapping on patients, even though I know it can be an effective therapy in some. Strapping is very effective at treating distal plantar fasciitis and plantar arch fatigue, which I call plantar intrinsic stress syndrome. It can be used to treat even posterior tibial tendon dysfunction if combined with a strapping above the ankle (i.e. high-Dye strapping). The problem I have with strapping is that it only is effective generally for a day or two at best, can cause significant skin irritation and skin reactions, and is very difficult to use over an extended time period. However, for a quick fix of plantar arch pain, there is probably nothing better other than having the patient in a boot-brace walker or on a nonweightbearing with crutches status.

    Foot orthoses are, by far, the best long term solution when one needs to reduce the magnitudes of abnormal subtalar and/or midtarsal joint moments to relieve the mechanically-based pathology of the patient. They do, however, rely on the patient needing to wear a shoe that will accommodate and function along with the orthosis in order to work properly. I greatly prefer foot orthoses to strapping just due to the durability factor.

    However, a few instances I may make an orthosis and have the patient also strap their foot. For example, in patients in barefoot sports or sports where I can't fit an orthosis, such as martial arts or gymnastics or ballet, strapping is much better than orthoses. I also use strapping in chronic ankle sprainers who play side to side sports to prevent ankle sprains since foot orthoses aren't as effective as an ankle strapping at stabilizing the ankle in these types of sports.

    Hope this helps.
     
  24. Atlas

    Atlas Well-Known Member

    Brilliant post Kevin.
     
  25. DSP

    DSP Active Member

    Kevin:

    Let’s assume you are treating a pt with proximal plantar fasciitis. If you don’t utilize strapping that often, do you like to experiment with padding, such as a cobra pad or MLA pad, before prescribing an orthotic? I would anticipate that padding would be more predictive in terms of being able to determine whether or not orthotic therapy will be successful rather than Low-Dye strapping.

    Regards,

    Daniel
     
  26. Daniel:

    I was once told by one of the third year surgical residents that I train in my office, after watching me cut adhesive felt for three months to fix insoles and orthoses for my patients, that I could probably fix anything with adhesive felt.:rolleyes: If you have access to my first book, you will see numerous articles I have written on using appropriately placed padding on shoe insoles or sockliners or over-the-counter orthoses to accomplish the goals of orthosis therapy for the patient. And, yes, the modified over-the-counter orthosis that I fabricate in the office would generally be much more predictive of the success of custom foot orthoses than low-Dye strapping.

    Good question. Have a nice weekend.:drinks
     
  27. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effect of low-dye taping on rearfoot motion and plantar pressure during the stance phase of gait.
    O'Sullivan K, Kennedy N, O'Neill E, Ni Mhainin U.
    BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008 Aug 18;9:111.
     
  28. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Efficacy of Taping for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciosis
    A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials

    Alexander T. M. van de Water, and Caroline M. Speksnijder
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association Volume 100 Number 1 41-51 2010
     
  29. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    I do not get this. In the results they state "The findings were strong evidence of pain improvement at 1-week", yet in the conclusion they say "There is limited evidence that taping can reduce pain in the short term in patients". Does anyone else find these two sentences incompatible?
     
  30. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of Short-term Treatment with Kinesiotaping for Plantar Fasciitis
    Chien-Tsung Tsai, MD Wen-Dien Chang* Jen-Pei Lee, MD
    Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain March 2010, Vol. 18, No. 1, Pages 71-80
     
  31. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Augmented low-Dye tape alters foot mobility and neuromotor control of gait in individuals with and without exercise related leg pain
    Melinda Franettovich, Andrew R Chapman, Peter Blanch and Bill Vicenzino
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2010, 3:5doi:10.1186/1757-1146-3-5
     
  32. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A comparison of augmented low-Dye taping and ankle bracing on lower limb muscle activity during walking in adults with flat-arched foot posture.
    Franettovich MM, Murley GS, David BS, Bird AR.
    J Sci Med Sport. 2011 Aug 29. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  33. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Immediate Effects of a Heel-Pain Orthosis and an Augmented Low Dye Taping on Plantar Pressures and Pain in Subjects With Plantar Fasciitis.
    Van Lunen B, Cortes N, Andrus T, Walker M, Pasquale M, Onate J.
    Clin J Sport Med. 2011 Oct 18. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  34. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A biomechanical analysis of the effects of low-Dye taping on arch deformation during gait.
    Yoho R, Rivera JJ, Renschler R, Vardaxis VG, Dikis J.
    Foot (Edinb). 2012 Oct 4.
     
  35. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effectiveness of Taping for the Short-Term Treatment of Pain and Walking Speed in Patients with Plantar Fasciitis
    Mira Mira, Angela BM Tulaar, Rosiana Pradanasari, Saptawati Bardosono
    J Indon Med Assoc. 2012;62:259-63.
     
  36. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Taping for plantar fasciitis.
    Podolsky R, Kalichman L.
    J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2014 May 27.
     
  37. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE AND TIME ON THE HEIGHT AND WIDTH OF THE MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL ARCH FOLLOWING THE MODIFIED REVERSE‐6 AND THE MODIFIED AUGMENTED LOW‐DYE TAPING PROCEDURES
    Mark W. Cornwall, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Thomas G. McPoil, PT, PhD, FAPTA, and Austin Fair, PT, DPT
    Int J Sports Phys Ther. Oct 2014; 9(5): 635–643.
     
  38. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Influence of application of the inelastic taping in
    plantar pressure of runners pronators.

    Juliana Rocha Rodrigues, Wesley Albuquerque Craveiro, Thiago Vilela Lemos, Fábio Alessandro Galvão
    MTP&RehabJournal 2014, 12:17-22
     
  39. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A Comparative Study between Taping and Medial Arch Support on EMG Activity of Selected Foot Muscles in Individuals with Flexible Flat Foot
    Wu Dabie, Raj Navin Daniel
    Indian Journal of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy - Year : 2014, Volume : 8, Issue : 4
     
  40. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Effects of Low Dye Taping on Vertical Foot Pressure in Subjects with Plantar Fasciitis
    Paolo Sanzo, Tony Bauer
    International Journal of Prevention and Treatment p-ISSN: 2167-728X e-ISSN: 2167-7298 2015; 4(1): 1-7
     
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