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Flexible flatfoot: differences in the relative alignment of each segment of the foot between symptom

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by NewsBot, May 17, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Flexible flatfoot: differences in the relative alignment of each segment of the foot between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.
    Moraleda L, Mubarak SJ.
    J Pediatr Orthop. 2011 Jun;31(4):421-8.
     
  2. footfan

    footfan Active Member

    OK so I have a question, this paper states "Inserts or shoe modifications do not have any effect on the development of the arch" but in Gould, N. (1989) Development of the childs arch it states that "Arches developed regardless of the footwear worn but development was faster during the first 2 years (until age 3 years) with arch support footwear"

    Rob, Craig ,Kevin, Simon , Mike any help??? :wacko:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2731836
     
  3. Jon heres my take,

    Think Davis and Wolffs law
    Think Kinetics verse Kinematics.

    Also really why is the arch height important it ? is not, so maybe we need to look in more detail of why to treat the flat footed or pronated foot type in children

    Right so if we take a flat footed child no lets take 2 exact copies who stress the same walk in the same foot prints ( not possible but good for the discussion )

    Child A we donĀ“t treat - control group if you will

    Child B we treat with an orthotic 1 of 3 things will happen after a few years,
    1 no kinetic or kinematic change
    2 kinetic change but not kinematic change
    3 kinetic and kinematic change

    for 1 there would be as seen in the 1st ie no help in development of the arch

    2 there will be no visual change in arch development but there will be an change in the forces acting to control the foot motion, ie if we could use internal strain gauges it would show us compared to the control child the muscle resisting Pronation are stronger, have under gone hopefully no deformation, the bone structure may have changes so the joint individual axial position will have altered giving a greater mechanical advantage to the muscles, ligament which resist pronation such as the spring and deltoid ligaments will be stronger, have less requirements to resist motion due to what I wrote above and again hopefully not undergone any deformation.

    3 with the changes in structure and strength relations listed in point 2 we get a kinematic change as well ie an arch.

    whats most important is the kinetic change and change in kinematics will indicate a greater change in kinetic therefore a greater result, but is arch height really an important measure - no

    Why the difference in outcome maybe just statistical luck the group in the 89 study were genetically going to develop arches.

    Does that help Jon ?
     
  4. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Gould et al used the term 'hyperpronation' in their study. Nuff said.
     
  5. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member

    Do we need a study to tell us this?

    I continue to get reports/referrals from foot and ankle surgeons referring to stable/meta stable feet, valgus/varus hinfoot alignment being the cause of undiagnosed pain, valgus forefoot descrptions when someone has a grossly pronated foot.

    It is pretty frustrating but when studies looking at kinematic effects of devices that are primarily designed to deal with kinetic issues are in abundance, is it any wonder nothing changes?
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Differences in pediatric vertical ground reaction force between planovalgus and neutrally aligned feet.
    Pauk J, Szymul J.
    Acta Bioeng Biomech. 2014;16(2):95-101.
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparison of Barefoot Walking and Shod Walking Between Children with and Without Flat Feet
    Jiann-Perng Chen, Meng-Jung Chung, Chao-Yin Wu, Kai-Wen Cheng, and Mao-Jiun Wang
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association: May 2015, Vol. 105, No. 3, pp. 218-225.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparison of Barefoot Walking and Shod Walking Between Children with and Without Flat Feet
    Jiann-Perng Chen, Meng-Jung Chung, Chao-Yin Wu, Kai-Wen Cheng, and Mao-Jiun Wang
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association: May 2015, Vol. 105, No. 3, pp. 218-225.
     
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