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Foot drop caused by single-level disc protrusion between t10 and l1.

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Dec 18, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Foot drop caused by single-level disc protrusion between t10 and l1.
    Zhang C, Xue Y, Wang P, Yang Z, Dai Q, Zhou HF.
    Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Dec 15;38(26):2295-301.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. HansMassage

    HansMassage Active Member

    This is actually an area I specialize in treating. Enervation between T10 and L1 affects the Psoas Minor Muscles. These stabilize the pelvis when the foot on the opposite side comes off the ground. Imbalance with one side chronically contracted and the other slack causes a twist in the pelvis and the resulting antalgic posture and gait.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Bodkin JJ1, Duff M2, Seereiter PJ Jr3, Chevli KK4.
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Wang Y, Nataraj A.
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Cerebral infarction presenting with unilateral isolated foot drop.
    Kim KW, Park JS, Koh EJ, Lee JM.
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Foot drop as the initial symptom caused by thoracic disc herniation
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