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Motion Control Shoe Delays Fatigue of Shank Muscles in Runners With Overpronating Feet

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Motion Control Shoe Delays Fatigue of Shank Muscles in Runners With Overpronating Feet
    Am J Sports Med March 2010 38:486-491;
    Roy T. H. Cheungand Gabriel Y. F. Ng
     
  2. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    The barefoot runners are going to hate this study!
     
  3. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    I agree with you... if by hate you mean ignore...
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Ouch, a couple of painful wordings. excessive rearfoot pronation, unstable feet.

    If they meant feet with high pronation moments from the ground and shoes to decrease the pronation moment from the ground it could be easier to define and measure.

    Unstable foot is very difficult to define.

    Also, it is interesting to think about using the peroneus longus and anterior tibial muscles as the muscles that would be measured to look at the effect of decrease in pronation moment from the ground.

    The anterior tibial in a very medially deviated axis foot can create a pronation moment. The peroneus longus muscle creates a direct pronation moment at the STJ at the same time it creates a plantar flexion moment at the first ray. The ideal muscle would be the posterior tibial muscle, but it is very difficult to measure with an EMG because of how deep it is. In feet with laterally positioned STJ axes we often see peroneal tendonitis and fatigue. A motion control shoe designed to shift the center of pressure more medial would tend to cause an increase in peroneal activity. On the other hand a shoe that had a more lateral center of pressure would tend to have a higher pronation moment from the ground and a faster pronation velocity that would have to be stopped when the medial forefoot hit the ground. At that point in time there will be very high dorsiflexion moments on the first ray and a case could be made that the peroneus longus muscle would have to work harder at that point in time. It is an interesting research question that does not appear to be addressed by the current study design.


    Regards,

    Eric
     
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