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Onychomycosis excluded recruit from air force

Discussion in 'Australia' started by mimipod, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. mimipod

    mimipod Member


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    Just finished treating a 22 yr old who was excluded on medical grounds from being admitted to the air force because he had a fungal infection of one great toenail :confused: He had a note from the medical officer that he would be reconsidered (or admitted - can't recall which) when it was cleared. Fortunatly we have now got it cleared and have given him the required documentation.
    :confused: :eek: :mad:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 10, 2006
  2. Felicity Prentice

    Felicity Prentice Active Member

    That is quite staggering! I had the fortune to be involved with the Australian Army (zillions of years ago), and examined all the new Apprentice recruits (mainly 15 year olds). It was interesting to note that not ONE of them had flat feet (this had obviously been screened out by the medical examination on application) - so that included flat feet that were perfectly functional of course.

    But I did get to see many many feet which were rigid pes cavus type (hmmmm....good arch there, he'll go for miles), the owners of which I inevitably saw a couple of months later with related stress injuries. I also saw one chap who had six toes - six mets and a radically wide cuboid. Boot fitting was a major issue. He explained to me that he was delighted when the examining doctor didn't notice his extra-dimensional-super-numery feet!

    I wonder what the standards are now for Feet, Suitable for the Army, Two of. If they are anything like the AirForce, we haven't got a prayer (or a soldier).

    cheers,

    Felicity
     
  3. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

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