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Potential sites of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Potential sites of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot: A cadaveric and imaging study.
    Ghosh SK, Raheja S, Tuli A.
    Clin Anat. 2012 Dec 17.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. bruk

    bruk Member

    Since I work primarily with and athletic population, I can't speak much toward sedentary patients, but historically abd. hallucis hypertrophy is seen in athletes participating in sports requiring high velocity forefoot impact (sprinting, jumping, etc), as noted in "Baxter's The Foot And Ankle In Sport".

    It is commonly misdiagnosed as plantar fasciitis, among other things. It is also one of the issues that I have seen grow over the past decade with an increase in runner's moving from heelstriking to midfoot or forefoot striking at initial ground contact. Those most affected are typically ones susceptible to excessive pronatory force, whether that stems from foot mechanics or hip mechanics.

    I have not yet read through this article other than the abstract above, but it would be interesting to see what the activity level, and what, if any, kinds of sports the study population participate in.

    Nice to have some objective testing methods available through ultrasound to identify a risk factor.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A STUDY OF TIBIAL NERVE BIFURCATION AND BRANCHING
    PATTERN OF CALCANEAL NERVE IN THE TARSAL TUNNEL

    D.Malar
    Int J Anat Res 2016, Vol 4(1):2034-36. ISSN 2321-4287
     
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