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Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Injuries for Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Oct 26, 2012.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.


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    Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Injuries for Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan
    Roy, Tanja C.; Knapik, Joseph J.; Ritland, Bradley M.; Murphy, Nicole; Sharp, Marilyn A.
    Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Volume 83, Number 11, November 2012 , pp. 1060-1066(7)
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Phil3600

    Phil3600 Well-Known Member

    Just out of interest - I did a tour of Helmand, Afghan in 2009/10 in a non-podiatric capacity, however, my skills as a pod were called upon on more than one occasion as I worked in the Field Hospital. From a podiatric point of view the most common complaint I saw, by far, was IGTN. P,fasc was fairly common and obviously a lot of fungal skin infections. I had some real whoppers in terms of ingrowers though and always with infection. There is a physio department out there which is mixed UK and US and that was a great set-up so I'd do the odd teaching session there too.

    The Operating theatre staff would let me use their bays and I do remember performing a PNA while a CAT-A patient was in the theatre having something amputated from an IED strike. All very surreal

    Some experience though.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    A prospective investigation of injury incidence and risk factors among army recruits in combat engineer training
    Joseph J Knapik, Bria Graham, Jacketta Cobbs, Diane Thompson, Ryan Steelman and Bruce H Jones
    Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology 2013, 8:5
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Changes in Dynamic Plantar Pressure During Loaded Gait.
    Goffar SL, Reber RJ, Christiansen BC, Miller RB, Naylor J, Rodriguez BM, Walker MJ, Teyhen DS.
    Phys Ther. 2013 Apr 11.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Impact of ballistic body armour and load carriage on walking patterns and perceived comfort.
    Park H, Branson D, Petrova A, Peksoz S, Jacobson B, Warren A, Goad C, Kamenidis P.
    Ergonomics. 2013 May 8
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Effects of wearing different personal equipment on force distribution at the plantar surface of the foot.
    Schulze C, Lindner T, Woitge S, Finze S, Mittelmeier W, Bader R.
    ScientificWorldJournal. 2013 May 16;2013:827671.
     
  8. Saab

    Saab Member

    Hi Phil,
    I am currently treating defence personel and Havent come across any fungal issues but I was wondering from your experience, do you have any specific "tricks" when advising management of chronic issues besides the usual-
    -airing out feet/ drying well
    -changing socks
    -changing boots
    -aluminum bases sprays
    -antifungal gels,creams, alcohol wipes
    - toe seperators

    Thanks
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Changes in Dynamic Plantar Pressure During Loaded Gait
    Stephen L. Goffar, Rett J. Reber, Bryan C. Christiansen, Robert B. Miller, Jacob A. Naylor, Brittany M. Rodriguez, Michael J. Walker and Deydre S. Teyhen
    Physical Therapy September 2013 vol. 93 no. 9 1175-1184
     
  10. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Conclusions Regardless of arch type, increases in load did not alter the relative distribution of force over the plantar foot during gait. Participants with high-arched feet had greater force in the medial forefoot region, whereas those with normally arched or low-arched feet had greater force in the great toe region, regardless of load. These differences in force distribution may demonstrate different strategies to generate a rigid lever during toe-off.

    Mahalo Newsbot!

    You are the greatest keep up the good work keeping us informed.

    If the army wants to research stategies to generate a rigid lever during toe off perhaps they could read some of their own financed research like SBIR A11-109 "Advanced Composite Insoles for the Reduction of Stress Fractures." found at www.kingetics.com under the MAREN tab.

    It seems that all the current tax payer funded army research on footwear is focused on punching more holes in boots so they they can breath better and drain water better from all the holes in the boots.

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/business...etter-boots/N9Nr0Mqi3MdY9CqoJhJlEI/story.html

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/26/sore-feet-spurs-army-fight-new-boots/

    Happy Friday,
    Steve
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Effect of armor and carrying load on body balance and leg muscle function
    Huiju Park, Donna Branson, Seonyoung Kim, Aric Warren, Bert Jacobson, Adriana Petrova, Semra Peksoz, Panagiotis Kamenidis
    Gait & Posture; Article in Press
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Effects of 8 weeks of military training on lower extremity and lower back clinical findings of young Iranian male recruits: A prospective case series.
    Boroujeni AM, Yousefi E, Moayednia A, Tahririan MA.
    Adv Biomed Res. 2014 Jan 9;3:20
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Return to Duty and Disability After Combat Related Hind Foot Injury.
    Sheean AJ, Krueger CA, Hsu JR.
    J Orthop Trauma. 2014 Apr 1.
     
  14. Ian Reilly

    Ian Reilly Well-Known Member

    Phil

    i was in Iraq: running a med unit rather than in my Pod capacity. Also got to do lots of feet! My docs were only too happy for me to do IGTNs, etc... :)

    Ian
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Risk of Lower Extremity Injury in a Military Cadet Population After a Supervised Injury-Prevention Program.
    Scott Carow, Eric Haniuk, Kenneth Cameron, Darin Padua, Steven Marshall, Lindsay DiStefano, Sarah de la Motte, Anthony Beutler, and John Gerber
    Journal of Athletic Training In-Press.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    RISK FACTORS FOR MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES IN DEPLOYED FEMALE
    SOLDIERS

    Tanja C. Roy, PhD, DPT, SCS
    PhD Thesis University of Pittsburgh, 2014
     
  17. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    Here is our best efforts to help better protect our soldiers standing ready in harm's way.


    Consider our technology and act on our mission, please.

    Link to BOOTS FOR TROOPS on Kickstarter.com

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/468642006/boots-for-troops

    Mahalo for your Kokua it is Pono,
    Steve

    Dr. Steven King
    Prior Army Podiatrist and Officer
    Co-Principle Investigator SBIR A11-109
    "Advanced Composite Insoles for the Reduction of Stress Fractures" US Department of Defense and Army Medical Research and Materials Command
    American Society of Testing Materials voting member
    - F13 Footwear Safety
    - E54 Homeland Security Applications and Body Armor Committees
    Member Kingetics LLC
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    A Description of Injuries in Men and Women While Serving in Afghanistan.
    Roy TC, Ritland BM, Sharp MA
    Mil Med. 2015 Feb;180(2):126-131.
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Adapted Marching Distances and Physical Training Decrease Recruits' Injuries and Attrition.
    Roos L, Boesch M, Sefidan S, Frey F, Mäder U, Annen H, Wyss T.
    Mil Med. 2015 Mar;180(3):329-336.
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Risk factors of acute and overuse musculoskeletal injuries among young conscripts: a population-based cohort study
    Henri Taanila, Jaana H Suni, Pekka Kannus, Harri Pihlajamäki, Juha-Petri Ruohola, Jarmo Viskari and Jari Parkkari
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2015, 16:104 doi:10.1186/s12891-015-0557-7
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Musculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation times
    Jagannath Sharma, Julie P Greeves, Mark Byers, Alexander Bennett and Iain R Spears
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2015, 16:106 doi:10.1186/s12891-015-0558-6
     
  22. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    "Conclusion When setting prevention priorities consideration should be given to both the incidence of specific injury diagnoses and their associated time to recovery"

    Perhaps it should read "Conclusion When setting prevention priorities consideration should focus on the type of treatment modality (type of footwear) that could decrease the incidence of specific injury diagnoses and their associated time to recovery."

    We need to look for serious solutions if 20% of all rehab days $$$ are for shin splints.

    If PU and EVA foam boots are not working what else will work?

    Mahalo,
    Steve

    ASTM E54 and F13 subject matter expert
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Residual Impact of Previous Injury on Musculoskeletal Characteristics in Special Forces Soldiers
    Shawn Kane, FACSM , John Abt , Julie Kresta , Jim Bakey , Jeffrey Parr , Timothy Sell , Scott Lephart, FACSM
    Presented at the ACSM Meeting; San Diego May 2015
     
  24. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    Thanks newsbot for the great thread.

    "CONCLUSION: Few physical differences existed between Soldiers with prior knee or back injury suggesting restoration of strength and flexibility."

    Interesting study but if a soldier does not rehab well enough from lower back or knee injury they would not be able to stay in the special forces and thereby would not be able to be part of the study.

    So does this conclusion still stand strong?

    Mahalo,
    Steve
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    What Risk Factors Are Associated With Musculoskeletal Injury in US Army Rangers? A Prospective Prognostic Study
    Deydre S. Teyhen PT, PhD, Scott W. Shaffer PT, PhD, Robert J. Butler PT, PhD, Stephen L. Goffar PT, PhD, Kyle B. Kiesel PT, PhD, Daniel I. Rhon PT, DSc, Jared N. Williamson DPT, Phillip J. Plisky PT, DSc
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; May 2015
     
  26. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Force and acceleration characteristics of military foot drill: implications for injury risk in recruits
    Patrick P J Carden, Rachel M Izard, Julie P Greeves, Jason P Lake, Stephen D Myers
    BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med 2015;1:bmjsem-2015-000025 doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2015-000025
     
  27. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Examination of the Effectiveness of Predictors for Musculoskeletal Injuries in Female Soldiers
    Einat Kodesh et al
    J Sports Sci Med. 2015 Sep; 14(3): 515–521.
     
  28. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Musculoskeletal Injuries During Military Initial Entry Training
    Scott D. Carow , Jennifer L. Gaddy
    Musculoskeletal Injuries in the Military pp 61-87 10 September 2015
     
  29. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Physiological and medical aspects that put women soldiers at increased risk for overuse injuries.
    Epstein, Y, Fleischmann, C, Yanovich, R, and Heled, Y.
    J Strength Cond Res 29(11S): S107–S110, 2015—
     
  30. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    The incidence and prevention of foot problems among male Phase One British Army recruits at an Army Training Regiment.
    Kelly RA.
    J R Army Med Corps. 2015 Dec;161 Suppl 1:i56-i59
     
  31. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    BMI and Lower Extremity Injury in U.S. Army Soldiers, 2001–2011
    Adela Hruby et al
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine; 14 December 2015
     
  32. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Association of Injury History and Incident Injury in Cadet Basic Military Training.
    Kucera, Kristen L.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Wolf, Susanne H.; Padua, Darin A.; Cameron, Kenneth L.; Beutler, Anthony I.
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: January 13, 2016
     
  33. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Musculoskeletal Lower Limb Injury Risk in Army Populations
    Kimberley A. Andersen, Paul N. Grimshaw, Richard M. Kelso, David J. Bentley
    Sports Medicine - Open 29 April 2016
     
  34. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury History, Strength, and Biomechanics in Female US Army Soldiers
    Kathleen M. Poploskiutet al
    Presented at the ACSM Annual Meeting; Boston 2016
     
  35. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters as Predictors of Lower-Limb Overuse Injuries in Military Training
    Shmuel Springer et al
    The Scientific World Journal Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5939164, 5 pages
     
  36. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Prevention and treatment of exercise related leg pain in young soldiers; a review of the literature and current practice in the Dutch Armed Forces
    Wes O Zimmermann et al
    J R Army Med Corps doi:10.1136/jramc-2016-000635
     
  37. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,
    When i was attending Officer Advanced Camp one of my fellow cadets had a bad blister on his little toe. He did not seek medical assistance because it would take him out of the training regimen which could reflect badly on his final rating and position in the army.
    The toe got bad and infected and the cadet got in trouble for not reporting the injury.

    Injury rates in military units may be under estimated for this reason.

    If the two most common blisters in the army are 5th toe and posterior heel blisters why don't the boot makers adapt to overcome this problem??

    A hui hou,
    Steve
     
  38. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Risk factors for lower leg, ankle and foot injuries during basic military training in the Maltese Armed Forces
    Matthew Psaila, Craig Ranson
    Physical Therapy in Sport; Article in Press
     
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