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Root-Weed are joints still left subluxed?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by dougpotter, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. dougpotter

    dougpotter Active Member


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    I believe I understand the Root-Weed style of orthotics--ie: Based on the idea that the foot will pronate until it's stable on the ground. My question is this: Aren't joints still left in a subluxed position at the midtarsal and Lisfranc joints? Shouldn't these joints first be aligned for for the Root-Weed approach to be effective?
     
  2. Jeff Root

    Jeff Root Well-Known Member

    Doug,

    I don’t understand your question. The Root, Weed casting technique, in most but not all case, calls for the STJ to be in the neutral position and the MTJ to be positioned fully pronated. The resulting balanced cast produces a device that mimics the plantar contour of the foot with the MTJ fully pronated.

    Subluxation is used to describe temporary dislocation of a joint which occurs when a joint moves beyond its normal range or direction of motion. If a foot is functioning excessively pronated, that doesn't mean that it or any other joint in the foot is necessarily subluxing. So, I'm not really sure what you’re asking.

    Jeff
     
  3. dougpotter

    dougpotter Active Member

    Talking about dorsal subluxation of the navicular on the talus and associated joints caused by collapse of medial longitudinal arch in adult acquired flatfoot.
     
  4. Jeff Root

    Jeff Root Well-Known Member

    Doug,

    This is an issue of functional adaptation of bone and tissue. Subluxation is a temporary state of dislocation of a joint but repetitive subluxation and can lead to functional adaptation of joints. These adapted positions are the "new" functional positions of these now abnormal joints. These joints have an anatomical range of motion and can still sublux, which could lead to further functional adaptation and deformity.

    Adult acquired flatfoot is a perfect example of this process. Adult acquired flatfoot is a progressive deformity and it needs to be treated early to prevent gross deformity. The goals of orthotic therapy are to 1) reduce pathological forces that would otherwise lead to increased deformity, 2) reduce pathological forces that result in pain, 3) attempt to alter forces in an effort to reduce the deformity. Reducing a forefoot supinatus soft tissue contracture (i.e. decreasing the varus angle of the forefoot) with an orthotic device is an example of this third goal.

    Casting out forefoot supinatus is a modification of the Root casting technique that helps reduce subluxation. There are also a number of other modifications that can be used in an effort to improve functional control in order to reduce these deforming forces.

    Respectfully,
    Jeff
     
  5. dougpotter

    dougpotter Active Member

    Thank you sir. I've ran for so many years and have encountered so many running injuries (I've probably been injured far more than I haven't) that it's, in a way, cathartic for me to learn what has happened to my feet and why I've had so many plagues. I appreciate the time you've given me to succinctly state those things that I try to unravel from time to time. Again, thank you.
     
  6. And if evolution had its way you'd have been eaten by now by the nearest predator..... what does that tell you?:bash::bash::bash::bash::bash::bash: derrrrrrr. Too many lay-people posting here is what it says to me.
     
  7. dougpotter

    dougpotter Active Member

    "Too many lay-people posting here is what it says to me."

    Possibly Simon, however, if I hadn't paid significant money for services provided by podiatrists that offered no more advice than www.heelspurs.com or similar Internet sites I would not be seeking education from health clinicians thought to be different from the those I've previously experienced. ;)
     
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