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Shank motion in flatfeet

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by ptulaya, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. ptulaya

    ptulaya Member


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    Dear all,

    I wonder any possility that flatfeet subjects walk with greater external rotated shank.


    Thanks for your comments.
     
  2. phil

    phil Active Member

    Could you please define "flat feet" and "shank"?
     
  3. I need advice on a similar case: patient is female 9 years old with severe STJ over pronation and hypermobile feet - MTJ, STJ (STJ evertion equils STJ invertion). I forgot to check her calves for tight triceps surae. I am casting her todsy to manufacture rigid orthoses with MLA as high as PT can tolerate and a Kirby backskive. ALthough her PTT works well, I thoght she will benifit from the supinating moment during normal gait. Not sure what to do for her dancing shoes. I recommended cycling (bicycle) to strengthen the plantar flexors of the foot - 3x/week for 15 minutes initially and increase as patient becomes stronger and older. Her ballet teacher said the pronation needs to be sorted out if she's serious about ballet. Any advice, I have been practicing for 4 years - first case of a hyper mobile ballet dancer with STJ pronation without severe pes planus.
     
  4. HansMassage

    HansMassage Active Member

    Is there proper proportions of lordosis and kyphosis in the spine? I have found that the compensation for failure to develop cervical and lumbar lordosis is often in foot pronation and tibia rotation. this allows walking with external muscles instead of the internal muscles attached to the spine.
    Hans Albert Quistorff, LMP
    Antalgic Posture Pain Specialist
     
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