Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

'The First Metatarsal Rise Sign' in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Craig Payne, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    I just stumbled on this 1996 paper that I either did not recall or missed; I have not come across this test in other sources either *or too dumb to recognize it!)

    The First Metatarsal Rise Sign: A Simple, Sensitive Sign of Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction
    Beat Hintermann, M.D. & Andr? G?chter, M.D.
    Foot & Ankle International April 1996 vol. 17 no. 4 236-241
    The sign:
    The finding:
     
  2. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I'm thinking about the supination resistance test in relation to this test. I remember Craig talking about how some feet would "break the supination resistance machine". I don't remember if it was medially deviated axis feet or PT tendon dysfunction feet that broke the machine. Regardless, My sense is that there is a high correlation between those feet. Then you look at the test where they take one hand and externally rotate the shank. Or they take one hand to move the heel into varus. Something is not adding up. One hand is a lot less than breaking the machine. If a subject keeps the same ratio of weight on the forefoot and the rearfoot, it is really hard to move the foot by grabbing the leg and twisting. Does the article have pictures of the test?

    Eric
     
Loading...

Share This Page