Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Better nutrition boosts diabetic foot outcomes

Discussion in 'Diabetic Foot & Wound Management' started by LER, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Hypozincemia in Mexican patients with diabetic foot ulcer treated out of hospital
    Juan F Sánchez-Cruz et al
    Cir Cir. 2022;90(1):34-40
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    NEWS RELEASE 9-FEB-2022
    New guidance highlights the importance of nutrition to support people living with diabetes and foot ulcers\A multidisciplinary team of medical professionals developed guidance for healthcare professionals outlining the importance of nutrition therapy to support wound healing for foot ulcers

    The guidance provides expert consensus regarding how nutrition from arginine, glutamine, hydroxymethylbutyrate (HMB), and micronutrients can help improve wound-care therapy for people living with diabetes who are more likely to develop foot ulcers


    ABBOTT PARK, Ill., Feb 9, 2022 – Today, guidance endorsed by the American Limb Preservation Society, entitled Nutrition Interventions in Adults with Diabetic Foot Ulcers,* was released highlighting the impact of nutrition-focused therapy in wound healing for adults living with diabetes who experience diabetic foot ulcers (DFU).



    The development of this guidance was the collaborative effort of a multidisciplinary team of medical professionals including–a podiatrist, registered dietitian, vascular surgeon and general/plastic surgeon. As a leader in science-based nutrition, Abbott supported the printing and distribution of this new guidance and has a long track record of research in wound-care therapy.



    "The guidance reinforces nutrition therapy, which is an often-overlooked part of wound care that can help provide patients with early and aggressive intervention," said David G. Armstrong, M.D., guidance co-author, founding president of the American Limb Preservation Society, professor of surgery at Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California and a part of Abbott's speakers bureau. "When clinicians take the time to engage with patients in a meaningful exchange of information and help manage glucose levels, quality of life and adherence are improved."



    In the U.S., more than 30% of people living with diabetes are at risk for developing a foot ulcer. Healing from DFU requires proper nutrition.** This guidance highlights that when patients receive nutrition education and are treated with nutrition intervention, they can incorporate the right nutrients in their diet to support the wound-healing process.



    Proper diet alone may be insufficient for patients to experience optimal healing for wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers. Ensuring sufficient hydration, protein, calories, and micronutrients like amino acids, vitamins and minerals, as well as tracking daily glucose targets, better supports the wound-healing process and allows patients to generate new tissue at the wound site.



    "Historically, nutrition guidance to help support the healing of foot ulcers in people with diabetes has been limited," said Maritza Molina, guidance co-author and registered dietitian nutritionist. "Patients with diabetes may develop a series of health issues over time if their diabetes is not well controlled. Glycemic control is the first and foremost goal, making medical nutrition therapy an important part of diabetes management."



    The guidance states that if someone cannot meet estimated nutrient needs with diet alone, targeted nutritional therapy is recommended. Oral nutritional supplements can be an option for supplying the nutrients necessary to support optimal wound healing.



    While primarily serving as guidance for clinicians, this tool is also a resource for people living with diabetes and stresses the importance of nutrition education, regular screening for nutritional deficiencies, and the importance of working with their healthcare team to create an individualized care plan.



    This guidance aims to serve as an educational tool, not as a stand-alone resource. Patient care and treatment should be made by healthcare professionals based on a patient's specific situation. This educational resource was produced and published with support from Guideline Central.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Nutritional Status Assessed with Objective Data Assessment Correlates with a High-Risk Foot in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Yusuke Mineoka et al
    J Clin Med. 2022 Feb 27;11(5):1314
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Nutritional Interventions May Improve Outcomes of Patients Operated on for Diabetic Foot Infections: A Single-Center Case-Control Study
    Ilker Uçkay et al
    Source
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Nutritional Interventions May Improve Outcomes of Patients Operated on for Diabetic Foot Infections: A Single-Center Case-Control Study
    Ilker Uçkay et al
    J Diabetes Res. 2022 Aug 5
     
Loading...

Share This Page