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Chi running shoe from New Balance

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    What is Chi running?
    From Chi Running.com

    Also see: SoCalRunning
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 6, 2008
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Chi running

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  5. DrPod

    DrPod Active Member

    I have been seeing more and more runners who claim to be "Pose" or "Chi" runners. I thought that they were nuts. So, thanks for the information above.
     
  6. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

    More on the New Balance & Chi running story:
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2016
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    The New Balance 800 Midfoot strike shoe has arrived (no more a rumour):

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Chi Running: ChiRunning® Shoe NB 800 Review

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  9. Foot Traffic

    Foot Traffic Member

    These guys do come across as clowns, and their claims about reducing injury etc with MFS does throw about some arguments. I am currently wearing these shoes and I love em.

    I'm no Chi or Pose runner, just a natural midfoot runner who trains in lightweight neutral shoes and races in the lightest flats I can find.

    The shoe is superb. For years I have been laterally posting my neutral shoes to get things right and this shoe seems to take away the need for additional support to the lateral column. It gives a nice positive BJ gear shift leading into propulsion as it possesses great forefoot flex combining with the large lateral post.

    I haven't had the opportunity to try them in many clients as they are quite new to NZ, but those I have viewed on Silicon Coach also show the same medial shift at propulsion.

    Whilst this shoe isn't for everyone, and perhaps should be sold on a Podiatrists Rx. I think it is refreshing to see NB looking outside the box of conventional designs and seeking ways to work with the recent BMX developments.

    I would be interested in any feedback others may have on this shoe and on the rear, mid and forefoot discussion

    Looking forward to checking out the running styles of the Worlds best at the coming Olympics T&F and marathon

    Cheers,
    Rob.
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Picked up this in Jeff Galloway's running newsletter:
    Back and foot injuries from Chi Running and Pose Running
    By Jeff Galloway
     
  11. Sounds very familiar...here's what I wrote a few months ago on the Newton Running shoes thread.

     
  12. Here are a few more comments that I made on Podiatry Arena over the last few years regarding the "Pose Technique" and "Chi Running" that mirror the wise words from Jeff Galloway:

     
  13. Jeremy Long

    Jeremy Long Active Member

    Please also keep in mind that New Balance is not necessarily a running technology sage, thinking outside their competitors' combined boxes. Virtually every technical running brand has some shoe in their collection intended to encourage this type of running technique. Brooks has their Ghost, Saucony has their Triumph/Echelon, etc., et. al. Then there's Velocy, whose sole design is exclusive to this gait type. The mechanics of most of these are very similar; like all brands, the fit will vary significantly among them. I personally believe this is a welcome trend, and getting the major running brands to think of things beyond inserting medial posts into everything.
     
  14. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    There has been a lot of discussion on the so called benefits (reduce injury & increase performance) of the various 'method style' running techniques. Tri('try':rolleyes:)athletes seem to be the main group that tends to grab hold of these ideas & run with them. I posted the following on a running forum after an increasing amount of pro 'Chi' & 'Pose' related threads/posts (sorry for the length)...

     
  15. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

    ChiRunning

    ChiRunning is a form of running influenced by t'ai chi.[1][2] It has been described as a "quasi-yoga-based style of running that is purported to reduce injury risk".[3]

    1. ^ Aubrey, Allison (September 14, 2006). "Chi Runners Poised for Softer Landings". NPR. Retrieved December 20, 2012.
    2. ^ Carol, Motsinger (June 18, 2012). "Motsinger: Columnist shares her course to complete the Asheville Citizen-Times; Half-Marathon Columnist will share her journey in trying to become a half-marathon runner". Citizen-Times. Asheville, North Carolina. Retrieved December 20, 2012.
    3. ^ Fitzgerald, Matt (May 5, 2009). "Can Running Technique Be Taught?". Competitor. Competitor Group, Inc. Retrieved December 20, 2012.
     
  16. Alex Adam

    Alex Adam Active Member

    Just interested, I have been seeing patients over the past 12 months who have been running in Chi shoes, they are now presenting with mid thorasic pathology. The worst case is comression of T9 that was not evident 18 months ago before the use of the shoe.
    A forward running style sees an increase in Trapezium muscle group to hold the head up possibly producing compressive forces in Thorasic. Any comments please.
     
  17. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    Sometime when I am bored, I go to Amazon.com and read the 1 star reviews of books, they are always good for a laugh. I was just browsing some 1 star book reviews on Danny Dreyer's Chi Running book. I had to laugh at this review:
    http://www.amazon.com/ChiRunning-Re...?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&filterBy=addOneStar
     
  18. Dana Roueche

    Dana Roueche Well-Known Member

    A few comments about heel vs mid foot strikers. Kevin has stated in multiple posts that "85% of runners are heel strikers". Matt stated that the "whole issue is multifactorial". Taking both comments into consideration, I would suggest that one of the multiple factors that affects and encourages a particular foot strike tendency has to do with the type of shoe the runner is wearing.

    It may very well be true that 85% of runners are heel strikers but is it also possible that 85% of runners are wearing shoes that greatly encourage heel striking and might make it almost impossible to run any other way but as a heel striker? If every runner wore shoes with no support or cushioning that had no height differential from heel to toe, I would speculate that the 85% heel striker tendency would drop considerably.

    I have a pair of Asics GT 2140 trail shoes that are stability shoes. I don't need the stability and consequently I hate the shoes. While running in them two days ago, I was thinking about heel strike and realized it was almost impossible to land any other way but heel first. I felt like I had a block of wood stuck under my arch and that the height differential between the heel and the forefoot was great enough to force the shoe to hit the ground heel first. They offered very little option other than to land heel first, then roll forward on the lateral edge of my foot before toeing off.

    On the other hand, last Saturday while on a 20 mile run on pavement in racing flats, I noticed that I was essentially landing midfoot in those shoes. I speculate that because the shoes have minimal cushion and only a small drop difference between heel and toe, that I "naturally" selected that style of landing. I might add that I tended to land on my heels even in those shoes before I started putting a lot of miles in wearing VFF. My feet would ache after wearing the racing flats as a heel striker. I have since learned how to run in them comfortably which is as a midfoot striker.

    Is it possible that when a runner wears shoes that encourage heel striking that if they try to fight that and run midfoot or forefoot that they are inviting issues to surface which will ultimately lead to injury?

    There is the advice that each runner needs to run with a style that fits them personally. I would take that further and suggest that the type of shoe they are wearing also plays a role in influencing running style.

    Just as an aside, before Danny Dryer moved to SF and developed Chi Running, he was a Colorado runner. I met him in a 50 mile race, he came in 2nd in 7 hrs 28 mins, I came in behind him in 3rd in 7 hrs 32 mins. I sincerely doubt he was practicing Chi running but he seemed to be a very efficient runner based on the 7 plus hours I watched him run while trialing behind him. I have to wonder if his race results improved or degraded after practicing Chi Running.

    Dana
     
  19. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    In my continuing effort to learn and understand "running", based on the recommendations and reviews, I purchased the latest book on Chi running by Danny Dryer, Chi Marathon.

    Like when you get any new book, I esgerly opened the parcel and opened the book to a random page ... on that page was a discussion of Libermanns article in Nature and how he compared African runners to runners in the USA. WRONG: Lieberann eliminated the African runners from the analysis.

    A bit disappointed, I flicked to another random page and it mentioned that plantar fasciitis was due too much impact on the heel. WRONG: Plantar fasciitis is due to to much strain in the plantar fascia. How does impact affect the strain in the plantar fascia? Not one of the many risk factor studies on plantar fasciitis have linked it to impacts.

    I put the book down. That was a week ago and I have not picked it up since.

    I just don't get it.....
     
  20. Craig:

    I believe a significant number of patients with plantar heel pain or "proximal plantar fasciitis" get this condition from increased compression forces acting from the ground at the medial calcaneal tubercle. These can occur both traumatically, such as jumping down from a fence, or from repetetive compression forces over a longer duration, such as from walking barefoot on hard surfaces or standing on hard surfaces for a long duration.

    The problem is that these compression forces are acting at the point of origin of the fibers of the central component of the plantar aponeurosis on the plantar aspect of the medial calcaneal tubercle so both compression forces and tension forces acting on the medial calcaneal tubercle, I believe, are responsible for the pain from proximal plantar fasciitis, in many cases. I am quite sure that, over time, research will show this hypothesis to be true .
     
  21. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    Forefoot/midfoot strikers still get plantar fasciitis
     
  22. The plantar calcaneus also receives significant compression forces during standing and walking. How do you know proximal plantar fasciitis is only from tension and not also from compression of the points of attachment of the plantar fascia on the medial calcaneal tubercle in some, if not many cases?
     
  23. Dana Roueche

    Dana Roueche Well-Known Member


    One of the things I never understood with Chi running is the premise of using gravity to help forward propulsion. Chi running teaches you to lean forward slightly to initiate a falling forward action. Basic physics tells me that gravity is a vertical force, NOT horizontal. It just doesn't make sense that a vertical force can push you horizontally.

    Basic running form will have you lean forward slightly but for other reasons than gravity. One is that with forward movement, you are facing wind resistance which is a horizontal force that you need to lean into. The second reason is to counter balance the forward propulsion generated from your feet and legs. Again a horizontal force.

    Dana
     
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