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Defining Abnormal Pronation

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Brian A. Rothbart, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. Dananberg

    Dananberg Active Member

    Brian,

    Do you honestly think that you are seeing different feet than I do? I have treated patients in every continent excepting Antarctica, and have NEVER seen what you describe. Sure, there are feet that do not respond to manipulation, but they are VERY rare. My only conclusion is that you either do not understand or practice manipulation, or your approach is grossly inadequate. Either way, you seem to be barking up the wrong tree. Your description of the PMS foot is simply one with a dorsiflexed 1st ray with limited TN joint medial rotation and not that unusual. Regardless of what term is used to describe an orthoses with a medial forefoot post directly under the 1st ray, it will only perpetuate the supinatus condition, and most likely why you believe this is non reducible. Good luck with whatever approach you choose, but I am now finished with this discussion.

    Howard
     
  2. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    Howard,
    Good discussion. Enjoyed your participation.
    Brian
     
  3. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    Someone asked to read my PhD dissertation. It can be accessed here.
     
  4. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    I read it. It did not take long. Very quick thoughts are:

    1) no hypotheses
    2) no research questions
    3) no references (even though you referenced yourself on page 1)
    4) By your pagination it was 38 pages long

    Size does not equate to quality, I would be the first to agree, but mine was 529 pages long.

    Who examined it? At which universities was it examined?

    I have it now on my file of documents to show my prospective students: this is what a PhD is not.

    Rob
     
  5. Rob:

    I love this line: "I have it now on my file of documents to show my prospective students: this is what a PhD is not."

    Thank you for pointing out that a fake PhD does not suddenly make an individual an expert.
     
  6. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    To coin a phrase that I have used for years: An expert is someone that knows that they don't know...............
     
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