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Footwear choices made by young women

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Nov 29, 2012.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Footwear choices made by young women and their potential impact on foot health.
    Branthwaite H, Chockalingam N, Jones M, Grogan S.
    J Health Psychol. 2012 Nov 27
     
  2. Boots n all

    Boots n all Well-Known Member

    Yes we needed a study to tell us that too!

    l recently spent a large amount of hours over three weeks with our 17 year old daughter looking for a pair of shoes for her end of year formal.

    No expense was to be spared, Dads paying! Would you believe after 18 stores and probably 80 pair of shoes tried on ranging from $185 -$300 she found a pair that ticked all the boxes...at Payless $48 and 15cm of heel

    Parameters of the search, colour and heel height to match the dress, oh and they must be cute!:rolleyes: comfort was meant to be in there somewhere l am sure, l just never heard it mentioned
     
  3. Tkemp

    Tkemp Active Member

    I remember the times I would go out dancing with friends and come home with blood inside my shoes where they'd rubbed my feet raw..... but they looked fabulous so I didnt stop wearing them! :rolleyes:
    Youth is an amazing thing! ;)
     
  4. gpeizner

    gpeizner Welcome New Poster

    From a retail perspective I have this conversation with my customers all the time, I get to see the long term effect from a non-medical perspective. Our comfort shoes tend not to appeal to any age due to there orthopedic look, but we typically cater to age 40 and up. Almost every customer will say something like "when I was younger I never had any problems, why do I have them now?"
     
  5. Cameron

    Cameron Well-Known Member

    netizens

    Contrary to popular belief there is very little independent evidence to demonstrate shoes or the choice of shoes has for the majority of shoe wearers an adverse effect on foot development and or pathomechanics. In the absence of such it remains a myth that shoes cause foot problems.

    toeslayer
     
  6. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Astute and interesting observation....:drinks
     
  7. Thanks Cameron:

    Also, contrary to popular belief there is very little independent evidence to demonstrate walking in the rain makes you get wet. In the absence of such it remains a myth that walking in the rain makes you wet.:rolleyes:
     
  8. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    While on principle I do not side with my friends simply because they are friends, maybe we ought to cut Cameron some slack here. So perhaps he is right - what is the evidence that "poor choice" of shoes causes future deformity? Purely anecdotally, my kids helped themselves from a box of shoes under the stairs - until they found a pair that they wanted - doesn't seemed to have done them any harm! To challange dogma is often beneficial; to run with dogma simply reinforces dogma. Those with the evidence - please put it on the table for us all to see.
     
  9. gpeizner

    gpeizner Welcome New Poster

    [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    As stated in a previous post I am not a podiatrist but am extremely interested in the field.

    http://www.josr-online.com/content/3/1/2

    Yes it's only 25 women so there may be lack of evidence, I also am not sure of some of the medical terms but this may be interesting to look at.

    http://jeb.biologists.org/content/213/15/2582.full.pdf

    The medical terms of course elude me. But once again it may be worth a look.
     
  10. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Re: [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    All that study showed was differences in EMG activity about the knee related to heel height. It does not provide any evidence that any of those EMG patterns are good or bad. It could be that the increase EMG activity in high heel shoes is a good thing, for eg, knee osteoarthritis. The problem with that study is that they measured a number of things in a group of high heel wearers compared to low heel wearers and found differences and concluded that "We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle’s active range of motion.". The problem is that did not actually show that. They fell into the correlation vs causation trap. It is just as possible that those with "shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness" choose to wear a higher heel shoe as it is more comfortable for them and the shoe had nothing to do with causing it in the first place.

    I have no doubt that shoes cause problems, its just Cameron's point was the actual lack of evidence to back the claim up!
     
  11. Re: [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    So then, Craig, you also agree with Cameron's statement?...."it remains a myth that shoes cause foot problems."

    Have we come to be, as a profession, so pedantic that we say that things are a "myth" just because they haven't been supported by peer-reviewed randomized research studies?

    Here's one that Cameron could have also said, and Rob could have agreed with, using the same logic:

    Contrary to popular belief there is very little independent evidence to demonstrate that parachutes actually prevent people from dying when jumping out a flying airplanes. In the absence of such it remains a myth that parachutes prevent death when jumping out of airplanes.

    Or, better yet, this one could also apply using the same logic:

    Contrary to popular belief there is very little independent evidence to demonstrate that walking in the rain makes a person get wet. In the absence of such it remains a myth that walking in the rain causes a person to get wet.

    I will find it to be very sad day when we come to a point in "our development" when common sense means nothing when evaluating clinical research. Is every bit of common knowledge that has not been shown to be true by peer-reviewed, blinded, randomized research studies now to be considered "a myth"?!:bang::butcher::boxing:
     
  12. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Re: [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    The word "myth" is probably not appropriate.

    The current belief is that poor footwear --> foot problems (and is probably right). However, it just could be that those with foot problems choose to wear poor footwear (which is a plausible alternative explanation) and in the absence of prospective data, it is not possible to definitively conclude one way or that other ... which I assume what Cameron was getting at.
     
  13. Re: [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    My point is, Craig, is that how many times does the intelligent and reasonable clinician need to see a woman wearing an overly tight shoe and getting a blister on her foot from where the shoe was tightly contacting the foot to conclude that the overly tight shoe caused that skin injury? Does a prospective research study really need to be performed for the intelligent and reasonable clinician to make the claim that shoes can cause foot injuries? I don't think so.

    Just because something hasn't been repeatedly shown to be supported by high quality research does not make it a "myth". It only demonstrates that it is not supported by high quality research. Period.
     
  14. Re: [Check4SPAM] RE: URL Attempt

    There are a lot if women wearing shoes that are too tight for them who don't have and pathology or don't go on to develop any even after extended use. I would think that those who do have reduced tolerance to local tissue stress and/or other local factors such as worn or torn inner lining, which combined with higher in-shoe pressure have a greater capacity for injury. Tight ladies fashion shoes may contribute to foot injury - but other conditions apply, is probably more accurate. The price you pay......
     
  15. Tkemp

    Tkemp Active Member

    Interesting enough, in Footy Season I get a surge of young male clients with IGTN
    They buy smaller footy boots as it increases their proprioception and ball control (apparantly).
    Co-incidence?!!? :rolleyes:

    My old hairdresser had shocking corns and callus wearing shoes with long, narrow toe boxes. You could see the deformation of the leather from where his feet pressed and rubbed.
    But these soft tissue problems must have other causes, naturally ;)

    Then there are the young dancers who go en pointe too early and end up with clawed toes and thickening and splitting of the nails. Plus callus and blisters from rubbing in the toe box. Especially if they dont correctly pad the toe area or bandage each digit before a performance.
    Yet, you'd think all the time they spent leaping in the air would reduce problems as they are only weight bearing part of the time :drinks
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  16. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member

    It is not the pointy ones or the high heels that vex me, it's the flatties that cause all the problems

    The ballet pumps, the plimsoles etc. However, as has been mentioned above, I think ou would be hard pushed to provide any evidence that this is the case.

    I see it as, and describe it to patients as, an unfortunate confluence of factors that cause pathology that is generally quickly resolved with change of footwear. And if you subscribe to the ZOOS theory then footwear is just one of a number of things that can be changed in order to reduce pathology

    Early Teenage girl --> rapid growth of bone with muscles playing catch up in length( in addition, there is probably an increase in activity levels when jumping up to senior school, everthing from walking between lessons in a large school to doing things like weekly crross country which would not have been the case in junior school)--> effective gastroc tightness -->increased PF tension --> in a heeled shoe there may be greater Windlass action -->greater resistance to external pronation moments-->less likelihood of PF problems and other pronation related pathologies

    Very simplistic but you get the drift. If you naturally have big ZOOS or have good muscle structure that absorbs the loads that otherwise would have gone through ligaments/PF etc then wearing flat shoes may not cause you any problems as is the case for people who walk barefoot.
     
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